Search

In Stock

Speak Well 1st Edition by Liz O’Brien – Test Bank

Instant delivery only

$28.00

Compare
SKU:tb1001447

Speak Well 1st Edition by Liz O’Brien – Test Bank

Chapter 8: Support Your Ideas

Level 1 = Knowledge

Level 2 = Understanding

Level 3 = Application

Level 4 = Analysis

True/False

  1. When using statistics in your presentation, it is best to avoid rounding the numbers.

Answer: False

Level: Knowledge

  1. Definition by example provides literal or actual meanings.

Answer: False

Level: Knowledge

  1. It is acceptable to take a testimony out of context if it supports your point.

Answer: False

Level: Knowledge

  1. You should use a variety of supporting materials.

Answer: True

Level: Knowledge

  1. Examples and descriptions are types of illustrative support.

Answer: True

Level: Understanding

  1. Narratives can be used to support a point in your presentation.

Answer: True

Level: Knowledge

  1. Narratives lack a universal appeal.

Answer: False

Level: Knowledge

  1. Audience members expect to hear stories that include a setup, conflict, climax, and resolution.

Answer: True

Level: Knowledge

  1. A story’s climax is when the characters are introduced.

Answer: False

Level: Knowledge

  1. Stories are generally told in the same way across all cultures.

Answer: False

Level: Knowledge

Multiple Choice

  1. When presenting facts to listeners, you should do which of the following?
  2. Incorporate some facts and omit others.
  3. Avoid truthiness.
  4. Verify accuracy of your facts.
  5. Use single sources.

Answer: C

Level: Knowledge

  1. Which of the following statements regarding definitions is true?
  2. Definitions are time-consuming.
  3. Definitions cannot serve as the foundation for your speech
  4. Definitions can make or break a point you are trying to communicate.
  5. Definitions are bookish, and make it hard for listeners to connect with your ideas.

Answer: C
Level: Knowledge

  1. Numerical data that describe some sort of relationship are what?
  2. Examples
  3. Anecdotal evidence
  4. Lay testimony
  5. Statistics

Answer: D

Level: Knowledge

  1. When using statistics during the presentation, you should do which of the following?
  2. Not explain the statistics because it gets too wordy.
  3. Round off numbers.
  4. Use statistics as often as possible.
  5. Give a lot of numbers to inform your audience.

Answer: B

Level: Knowledge

  1. If you tell your listeners what a word or concept is not, you are giving a definition by
  2. contrast.
  3. operation.
  4. example.
  5. comparison.

Answer: A

Level: Understanding

  1. A definition that provides extended details is a definition by
  2. comparison.
  3. contrast.
  4. explanation.
  5. operation.

Answer: C

Level: Knowledge

  1. A mini-narrative with a plot is an example of a(n) what?
  2. Emotional example
  3. Extended-example
  4. Explanation example
  5. Brief example

Answer: B

Level: Knowledge

  1. The type of proof that references human feelings to support a point is which of the following?
  2. Emotional
  3. Logical
  4. Ethical
  5. Rational

Answer: A

Level: Knowledge

  1. In his speech, Bill talked about drunk driving and told a story about his cousin being hit by a drunk driver. This information is what?
  2. Objective support
  3. Personal experience
  4. Statistical evidence
  5. Definition

Answer: B

Level: Application

  1. When using testimony in your speech, you should do which of the following?
  2. Take the testimony out of context.
  3. Use it as much as possible.
  4. Give the listeners some context about the person who gave the testimony.
  5. Use any testimony that is stated by someone famous regardless of its relevance.

Answer: C

Level: Understanding

  1. Support that includes examples, descriptions, and explanations is called what?
  2. Objective support
  3. Testimonial support
  4. Illustrative support
  5. Relevant support

Answer: C

Level: Knowledge

  1. Personal experience is a type of what?
  2. Statistical evidence
  3. Expert testimony
  4. Explanatory evidence
  5. Anecdotal evidence

Answer: D

Level: Knowledge

  1. Support not based on facts that are measurable or observable is considered what?
  2. Objective
  3. Subjective
  4. Illustrative
  5. Statistical

Answer: B

Level: Understanding

  1. If you use information from people who have authority on a topic, you are using what?
  2. Lay testimony
  3. Expert testimony
  4. Standard testimony
  5. Conventional testimony

Answer: B
Level: Understanding

  1. If your sources are considered relevant, your support
  2. has a logical connection to the idea that you are communicating.
  3. contradicts the audience and occasion.
  4. has good variety.
  5. is paraphrased.

Answer: A
Level: Knowledge

  1. Instead of directly quoting a source, Marianne put the information in her own words. What is this called?
  2. Statistics
  3. Paraphrasing
  4. Citing
  5. Being appropriate

Answer: B

Level: Understanding

  1. Robert wants to back up his own idea by showing that another credible person supports it. He should use which of the following?
  2. Statistics
  3. Definitions
  4. Personal experience
  5. Testimony

Answer: D

Level: Application

  1. As a source in your presentation, personal experience should be used
  2. as your only form of support.
  3. only if you can’t find anything else to use.
  4. in conjunction with other supporting material.
  5. without introducing it as personal experience.

Answer: C

Level: Understanding

  1. Janie wanted to use statistics in her presentation. She rounded numbers, cited the source of her statistics, used eleven sets of statistics, and explained what the statistics meant. What should she do in her next presentation to improve upon her use of statistics?
  2. Avoid rounding numbers.
  3. Not cite the source.
  4. Use fewer statistical sets.
  5. Give the statistics without explaining them.

Answer: C

Level: Analysis

  1. Because humans are storytelling beings, one professor has labeled humans as what?
  2. Narus storus
  3. Homo narrans
  4. Namos human
  5. Homo storius

Answer: B

Level: Knowledge

  1. Myths, legends, and folktales are examples of what?
  2. Conflict
  3. Visual support
  4. Narratives
  5. Credibility

Answer: C

  1. If you tell a story about morals, it is most likely a narrative to
  2. instruct and inspire.
  3. entertain.
  4. evoke emotions.
  5. put a human face on a general concept.

Answer: A

Level: Understanding

  1. Telling a single story to draw a general conclusion and support a point you’re trying to make serves as what?
  2. Conflict
  3. Anecdotal evidence
  4. Hypothetical narrative
  5. Emotional proof

Answer: B

Level: Understanding

  1. Introducing the characters and scene of a story are included in a narrative’s
  2. setup.
  3. conflict.
  4. climax.
  5. resolution.

Answer: A

Level: Understanding

  1. An invented story that can be used to discuss past or future events is also known as a(n)
  2. component.
  3. anecdotal evidence.
  4. urban legend.
  5. hypothetical narrative.

Answer: D

Level: Knowledge

  1. The first thing to occur in the narrative structure is the
  2. climax.
  3. conflict.
  4. setup.
  5. resolution.

Answer: C

Level: Understanding

  1. If you tell a story to connect an abstract idea to a person’s experience, you use the narrative to do which of the following?
  2. Instruct and inspire
  3. Entertain
  4. Evoke emotions
  5. Put a human face on a general concept

Answer: D

Level: Understanding

  1. When telling a hypothetical narrative you should do which of the following?
  2. Pass it off as the truth.
  3. Tell your audience that it is hypothetical.
  4. Let the audience decide for itself if it is true or not.
  5. Read it word for word from a notecard.

Answer: B

Level: Understanding

  1. Which statement about narratives is false?
  2. Narratives lack a specific structure.
  3. Narratives can have strong emotional content.
  4. Narratives can be told strictly to entertain the audience.
  5. Narratives are sometimes false.

Answer: A

Level: Understanding

  1. If you employ a story in your speech to augment an argument, you use the narrative as what?
  2. An opening device
  3. A supporting point
  4. Structure
  5. Entertainment

Answer: B

Level: Understanding

  1. If someone’s entire speech is constituted of one story, the speaker uses the narrative as what?
  2. Emotional proof
  3. Closing device
  4. Emotional proof
  5. Structure

Answer: D

Level: Understanding

  1. When using an urban legend in your speech, you should do which of the following?
  2. Use only stories that are completely true, regardless of the point you are making.
  3. Include them liberally.
  4. Research the accuracy of the story and report it to the audience.
  5. Share them as if they were true.

Answer: C

Level: Understanding

  1. People are used to hearing stories told in a particular way, or
  2. in narrative patterns.
  3. without organization.
  4. with the climax at the beginning.
  5. without a resolution.

Answer: A

Level: Knowledge

  1. A narrative that evokes emotion can be what?
  2. A successful persuasion strategy
  3. Part of a successful informative structure
  4. Falsely placed
  5. Discrediting to the speaker

Answer: A

Level: Understanding

  1. The story about the emperor’s new clothes serves to do what?
  2. Explain a difficult concept.
  3. Evoke feelings of fear or joy.
  4. Function as an urban legend.
  5. Instruct or demonstrate proper morals.

Answer: D

Level: Application

  1. In traditional Western narrative structure,
  2. the resolution comes before the conflict and climax.
  3. the setup comes after the climax.
  4. the setup is the peak of complication.
  5. the climax is the peak of complication.

Answer: D

Level: Understanding

  1. Andrew has included facts, definitions, and a few statistics in his presentation. He is relying on which type of support?
  2. Subjective
  3. Emotional
  4. Objective
  5. Narrative

Answer: C

Level: Understanding

  1. In order to help his listeners, Paul provided the literal meanings to complicated terminology in his speech. In doing so, Paul is giving definitions
  2. by contrast
  3. from the dictionary
  4. by explanations
  5. by example

Answer: B

Level: Knowledge

  1. By being yourself and letting your authentic emotions show through your speech delivery you are
  2. being emotionally generous
  3. being culturally sensitive
  4. showing emotional proof
  5. giving personal testimony

Answer: A

Level: Application

  1. Support that is especially common in conversational interactions is called what?
  2. Illustrative
  3. Objective
  4. Testimonial
  5. Statistical

Answer: A

Level: Understanding

Fill-in-the-Blank

  1. A(n) ___________________ gives an illustration of a broader concept by providing a specific instance of a general case.

Answer: Example

Level: Knowledge

  1. _____________________ support is based on opinions or feelings.

Answer: Subjective

Level: Knowledge

  1. A definition by ______________________ explains words by saying what they do or the functions they perform.

Answer: Operation

Level: Knowledge

  1. _______________________ go beyond definitions or descriptions to provide background or additional information.

Answer: Explanations

Level: Knowledge

  1. _________________ support is measurable, observable, and consistent.

Answer: Objective

Level: Understanding

  1. If a speaker tells only one story to support an argument, she uses ____________________ __________________.

Answer: Anecdotal evidence

Level: Application

  1. In narrative structure, _________________ is something that causes the action to move toward the climax.

Answer: Conflict

Level: Knowledge

  1. An “invented story” that sometimes refers to past or future events is also referred to as a(n) ________________ narrative.

Answer: Hypothetical

Level: Knowledge

  1. If you use a narrative as ____________________________, you attempt to convey feelings to affect the audience.

Answer: Emotional proof

Level: Understanding

  1. Narrative ______________ speaks to how true and human the story appears.

Answer: fidelity

Level: Knowledge

Essay

  1. Identify the three criteria for selecting support, and explain how you should use each criterion to evaluate the support.

Answer: Relevance should be used to determine if your support has a logical connection to the idea that you are communicating. Appropriateness is another criterion to use. Your supporting materials should complement the audience, topic, and occasion. Variety is the third criterion. Your ideas should be backed up with multiple forms of support.

Level: Application

  1. Identify three types of objective support, and create statements that illustrate each type.

Answer: The three types are facts, definitions, and statistics. Examples of each will vary. Facts are verifiable and can be proven. Definitions explain what a word or an idea mean. Statistics are numerical data.

Level: Application

  1. Compare and contrast the three kinds of illustrative support noted in the book.

Answer: The illustrative examples clarify, expand on, or provide more information to the listeners. Examples provide a specific instance of a general case. Descriptions bring an idea to life or create an image through expanded details. Explanations provide background or additional information.

Level: Understanding

  1. Discuss the guidelines to follow when using testimony as a form of support.

Answer: Give your listeners some context about the person whose words you are using. Make sure that the testimony is relevant to your point. Know the source of the testimony. Do not take the testimony out of context. Use testimony sparingly.

Level: Understanding

  1. Explain what you need to do when using statistics during your presentation.

Answer: Explain what the statistic means. Simplify numbers for your listeners by rounding them. Avoid overusing statistics.

Level: Understanding

  1. Identify and describe the components of a narrative.

Answer: Character is who; the action is what is happening; and the scene is where and when the action takes place.

Level: Knowledge

  1. Explain how narratives can enhance the speaking experience.

Answer: They create images that connect with the audience; they evoke emotions; they instruct and inspire, they entertain; they humanize general concepts and simplify abstract or complex ideas; they are easy to tell and remember; and they increase perceived credibility

Level: Understanding

  1. Tell a short story and label the four components of narrative structure.

Answer: Will vary. The setup starts action and introduces the characters and scene; conflict is an event that causes the action to move toward the climax; the climax is the peak of tension or most exciting moment; the resolution occurs when the conflict is resolved and comes to an end.

Level: Application

  1. List four ways to use a narrative in your speech.

Answer: To open or close the speech; to support a point; to provide emotional proof; and to structure the entire speech.

Level: Knowledge

  1. Briefly identify an urban legend and explain why you should or should not use it to support a point.

Answer: Will vary. Analysis as to why urban legends should be avoided should include: risking credibility by spreading the myths because they can be false. Analysis as to why urban legends should be used should include: using them to prove or disprove a certain point if the story is identified as an urban legend, and they can be funny or entertaining.

Level: Analysis

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Write a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to Top
Product has been added to your cart