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Sensation And perception 2nd Edition By Jeremy M. Wolfe – Test Bank

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Sensation And perception 2nd Edition By Jeremy M. Wolfe – Test Bank

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Chapter: Chapter 8: Multiple Choice

Multiple Choice

  1. Optic ataxia, as illustrated in the opening vignette with patient J. R., is a deficit in the:
  2. A) ability to produce appropriate motor movements in response to visual information.
  3. B) ability to differentiate colors based on visual information.
  4. C) ability of photopigment molecules to regenerate after isomerization to the all-trans
  5. D) ability of the lens shape to accommodate in order to focus on objects at different distances.

Ans: A

Level: M

Page: 263

Topic: Vision Affects Action

  1. Visual information used to control an ongoing movement is known as _____.
  2. A) spectral sensitivity
  3. B) visual acuity
  4. C) visual feedback
  5. D) prism adaptation

Ans: C

Level: E

Page: 265

Topic: Vision Affects Action

  1. As the speed of a movement increases, its accuracy decreases. This is called:
  2. A) the perception/action cycle.
  3. B) the problem of visual feedback.
  4. C) optic flow.
  5. D) the speedaccuracy tradeoff.

Ans: D

Level: E

Page: 266

Topic: Time to Process Visual Feedback

  1. Experiments by Woodworth (1899) on the speedaccuracy tradeoff showed that:
  2. A) up to a movement speed of about 120-140 per minute, there was a distinct advantage

with eyes closed.

  1. B) below the speed of 120 per minute , participant’s under the eyes open condition performed worse than participants’ with their eyes closed.
  2. C) at movement speeds of about 140 per minute and faster, there was little difference between eyes open and eyes shut conditions.
  3. D) for both slow and fast speeds, there was no difference between the eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions.

Ans: C

Level: M

Page: 266

Topic: Time to Process Visual Feedback

  1. Experiments by Keele and Posner (1968) estimated the visual feedback processing time was between:
  2. A) 400 and 500 msec.
  3. B) 190 and 260 msec.
  4. C) 100 and 150 msec.
  5. D) 300 and 350 msec.

Ans: B

Level: M

Page: 267

Topic: Time to Process Visual Feedback

  1. Experiments by Woodworth (1899) illustrating the speedaccuracy tradeoff showed that the estimated time to use visual feedback was _____ msec.
  2. A) 129
  3. B) 229
  4. C) 329
  5. D) 429

Ans: D

Level: E

Page: 266

Topic: Time to Process Visual Feedback

  1. The estimate of the visual feedback processing time as determined by Keele and Posner (1968) was:
  2. A) greater than the time estimated by Woodworth’s original study.
  3. B) lesser than the time estimated by Woodworth’s original study.
  4. C) the same as was estimated by Woodworth’s original study.
  5. D) more than three times of that determined by Woodworth’s original study.

Ans: B

Level: D

Page: 267

Topic: Time to Process Visual Feedback

  1. When one is looking straight ahead at one’s navigation goal while walking forward, the pattern of optic flow tells the person that his or her:
  2. A) focus of expansion moves inward from the periphery.
  3. B) focus of expansion is shrinking.
  4. C) heading is toward a stationary object in the scene.
  5. D) heading is directly toward the focus of expansion.

Ans: D

Level: M

Page: 267

Topic: Optic Flow

  1. When an individual is moving through a scene, objects and surfaces in the retinal image move _____ from the point in the scene toward which one is moving.
  2. A) outward
  3. B) inward
  4. C) backward
  5. D) forward

Ans: A

Level: E

Page: 267

Topic: Optic Flow

  1. Warren and Hannon (1998) showed that when the eyes of individuals move as they walk forward—say, to track a stationary object off to one side, the individuals:
  2. A) focus of expansion corresponds to the navigation goal.
  3. B) lose their balance and fall.
  4. C) can still judge their heading accurately.
  5. D) are unable to judge their heading accurately.

Ans: C

Level: M

Page: 267

Topic: Optic Flow

  1. Fraka is standing still when the wall in front of her suddenly moves away from her. She will respond reflexively by leaning sharply _____ to compensate for the perceived sway.
  2. A) forward
  3. B) backward
  4. C) to the left
  5. D) to the right

Ans: A

Level: D

Page: 268

Topic: Optic Flow

  1. Using a room in which the walls and ceiling could move independent of the floor, Lee and Aronson (1974) demonstrated that:
  2. A) optic flow was unrelated to maintaining an upright position.
  3. B) optic flow could cause children to stagger and fall.
  4. C) the focus of expansion corresponded to the position of a stationary object.
  5. D) the navigation and focus of expansion overlap if a person walks straight ahead.

Ans: B

Level: M

Page: 268

Topic: Optic Flow

  1. Lee and Aronson (1974) experimentally demonstrated the role of:
  2. A) visual perception in carrying out future planned actions.
  3. B) perception and action cycle in initiating and guiding a movement.
  4. C) prism adaptation in compensating for inaccurate movements.
  5. D) optic flow in standing upright.

Ans: D

Level: M

Page: 268

Topic: Optic Flow

  1. Studies on prism adaptation show that when people initially wear wedge prism goggles, they:
  2. A) make large errors in executing more complex actions.
  3. B) are highly accurate in executing complex tasks.
  4. C) are unaffected by the shift in focus caused by the prism.
  5. D) are unable to adapt to wearing the prism.

Ans: A

Level: M

Page: 269

Topic: Prism Adaptation

  1. The rapid adjustment referred to as _____ shows that one can use visual information to recognize errors in one’s movements and correct future movements.
  2. A) optic flow
  3. B) prism adaptation
  4. C) spatial frequency
  5. D) perihand space

Ans: B

Level: E

Page: 269

Topic: Prism Adaptation

  1. Kellan has been wearing prism goggles that shift his field of view to the left. Initially, he threw a ball too far to the left of a target, but later he was able to hit the target accurately. He removes the goggles and aims at the target again. His throw will likely:
  2. A) be too far to the left of the target.
  3. B) be too much in front or too far behind the target.
  4. C) be too far to the right of the target.
  5. D) accurately hit the target.

Ans: C

Level: D

Page: 269

Topic: Prism Adaptation

  1. Studies with prism adaptation show that after adaptation, if a person is asked to point straight ahead with eyes closed:
  2. A) the person will point off to one side.
  3. B) the person will point upward.
  4. C) the person will point downward.
  5. D) the person will point straight ahead.

Ans: A

Level: M

Page: 269

Topic: Prism Adaptation

  1. Research by Bekkering and Neggers (2002) on action plans showed that, when participants had to either point at or grasp target blocks, _____.
  2. A) the participants looked to an object with the correct color significantly more often when the task was grasping than when the task was pointing
  3. B) the participants looked to an object with the correct orientation significantly more often when the task was pointing than when the task was grasping
  4. C) regardless of whether the task was pointing or grasping, participants almost always looked to an object with the correct orientation
  5. D) regardless of whether the task was pointing or grasping, participants almost always looked to an object with the correct color

Ans: D

Level: M

Pages: 270-271

Topic: Action Plans

  1. Experiments performed by Symes et al. (2008) showed that, when participants had to pinch a button instead of grasping a lever on identifying a difference in a visual display, they were:
  2. A) always faster at pinching the button, no matter what the change in the display was.
  3. B) faster at detecting the difference between small items in the display.
  4. C) faster at detecting the difference between large items in the display.
  5. D) always slower at pinching the button, no matter what the change in the display was.

Ans: B

Level: M

Pages: 271-272

Topic: Action Plans

  1. In a study on perception of objects within perihand space, Abrams and Weidler (2014) showed that:
  2. A) visual perception of objects is unrelated to the perihand space.
  3. B) visual perception of objects is better when the object is not in perihand space.
  4. C) visual perception of objects is better when the object is in perihand space.
  5. D) visual perception of objects is the same for objects both in and outside perihand space.

Ans: C

Level: M

Pages: 274-275

Topic: Action Capabilities

  1. Images with low spatial frequencies:
  2. A) provide a lot of fine detail about the visual image.
  3. B) tend to lack contrast with the background.
  4. C) are unable to capture the overall shape of the objects.
  5. D) provide information that is more useful for actions than high-spatial-frequency images.

Ans: D

Level: M

Page: 275

Topic: Action Capabilities

  1. If your hands were within reach of a mug, which characteristic of the mug would you be better at perceiving than if your hands were out of reach?
  2. A) the texture of the mug
  3. B) the handle shape of the mug
  4. C) the writing on the mug
  5. D) the details of the picture on the mug

Ans: B

Level: D

Page: 275

Topic: Action Capabilities

  1. According to the action-specific perception theory, _____.
  2. A) our perceptions are shaped by our abilities to perform actions
  3. B) our actions are not shaped by our perceptions
  4. C) perihand space determines our actions and perceptions
  5. D) prism adaptation is a consequence of our actions and perceptions

Ans: A

Level: M

Page: 276

Topic: Action Capabilities

  1. _____ are characteristics of an experiment that might lead participants to respond differently than they otherwise would have if they weren’t participating in the experiment.
  2. A) Demand characteristics
  3. B) Receptive characteristics
  4. C) Lateral characteristics
  5. D) Bimodal characteristics

Ans: A

Level: E

Page: 276

Topic: Action Capabilities

  1. Minh, during football practice on Monday, judges by visual perception that he can easily score a 40-yard field goal. However, on Tuesday, he strains his leg. Afterward, when he looks at a similar 40-yard field goal attempt, he says it looks harder and more like a 50-yard attempt. This is consistent with:
  2. A) perihand space theory.
  3. B) demand characteristic theory.
  4. C) action-specific perception.
  5. D) the role of optic flow in visual feedback.

Ans: C

Level: D

Page: 276

Topic: Action Capabilities

  1. According to the text, which lobes are well suited for guiding actions due to their location near the motor regions of the frontal lobe?
  2. A) parietal
  3. B) frontal
  4. C) occipital
  5. D) temporal

Ans: A

Level: E

Pages: 277-278

Topic: The Role of the Parietal Lobe in Eye Movements, Reaching, and Grasping

  1. According to the text, the lateral occipital cortex and inferotemporal cortex are well positioned to deliver visual information to structures of the _____.
  2. A) parietal lobe
  3. B) medial temporal lobe
  4. C) prefrontal lobe
  5. D) occipital lobe

Ans: B

Level: E

Page: 278

Topic: The Role of the Parietal Lobe in Eye Movements, Reaching, and Grasping

  1. Ungerleider and Mishkin’s (1982) studies on the dorsal pathway showed that lesions in the parietal cortex led to an inability to carry out tasks related to knowing the:
  2. A) ‘what’ of the object.
  3. B) ‘when’ of the action.
  4. C) ‘where’ of the object.
  5. D) ‘who’ of the action.

Ans: C

Level: M

Page: 277

Topic: The Role of the Parietal Lobe in Eye Movements, Reaching, and Grasping

  1. The parietal lobe is divided into the anterior and posterior lobes by the _____ sulcus.
  2. A) postcentral
  3. B) central
  4. C) intraparietal
  5. D) cingulate

Ans: A

Level: E

Page: 278

Topic: The Role of the Parietal Lobe in Eye Movements, Reaching, and Grasping

  1. Which two parietal lobules are separated by the intraparietal sulcus?
  2. A) anterior and posterior
  3. B) anterior and central
  4. C) superior and inferior
  5. D) superior and anterior

Ans: C

Level: M

Page: 278

Topic: The Role of the Parietal Lobe in Eye Movements, Reaching, and Grasping

  1. The _____ contains a somatosensory representation of the body’s surface.
  2. A) anterior parietal lobe
  3. B) posterior parietal lobe
  4. C) medial intraparietal area
  5. D) lateral intraparietal area

Ans: A

Level: M

Page: 278

Topic: The Role of the Parietal Lobe in Eye Movements, Reaching, and Grasping

  1. The _____ contains a variety of functionally specialized regions that support perceptually guided action and other functions.

. A) anterior parietal lobe

  1. B) posterior parietal lobe
  2. C) premotor cortex
  3. D) motor cortex

Ans: B

Level: M

Page: 278

Topic: The Role of the Parietal Lobe in Eye Movements, Reaching, and Grasping

  1. The region of the posterior parietal lobe in monkeys that is involved in the control of eye movements is the _____.
  2. A) medial intraparietal area
  3. B) lateral intraparietal area
  4. C) premotor cortex
  5. D) motor cortex

Ans: B

Level: M

Page: 278

Topic: The Role of the Parietal Lobe in Eye Movements, Reaching, and Grasping

  1. The _____ contains neurons that are active when a monkey or human is involved in planning a reach to a specific location.
  2. A) medial intraparietal area
  3. B) lateral intraparietal area
  4. C) premotor cortex
  5. D) motor cortex

Ans: A

Level: M

Page: 279

Topic: The Role of the Parietal Lobe in Eye Movements, Reaching, and Grasping

  1. The anterior intraparietal area of the posterior parietal lobe is thought to be involved in _____ movements.
  2. A) perceptually guided
  3. B) eye
  4. C) reaching
  5. D) grasping

Ans: D

Level: M

Page: 280

Topic: The Role of the Parietal Lobe in Eye Movements, Reaching, and Grasping

  1. _____ are sensitive both to visual information from the space near the hand as well as to tactile stimulation of the hand.
  2. A) Pseudo-unipolar neurons
  3. B) Bipolar neurons
  4. C) Bimodal neurons
  5. D) Mirror neurons

Ans: C

Level: M

Page: 280

Topic: Bimodal Neurons and Hand-Centered Receptive Fields

  1. _____ is the visual receptive field of a neuron that responds to visual stimuli near the hand, based on the location of the stimulus relative to the hand, not on the retinal location stimulated.
  2. A) Center-surround receptive field
  3. B) Off-center receptive field
  4. C) On-center receptive field
  5. D) Hand-centered receptive field

Ans: D

Level: E

Page: 280

Topic: Bimodal Neurons and Hand-Centered Receptive Fields

  1. A neuron who’s response is based on the object’s location relative to the hand and not on the retinal location stimulated by the object is said to have a:
  2. A) pseudo-unipolar response.
  3. B) hand-centered receptive field.
  4. C) retina-centered receptive field.
  5. D) high-spatial-frequency response.

Ans: B

Level: M

Page: 280

Topic: Bimodal Neurons and Hand-Centered Receptive Fields

  1. Experiments with monkeys have shown that hand-centered receptive fields of bimodal neurons expand to include locations near a handheld tool in order to support control of visually guided actions with tools. The neuron’s receptive field expanded to include the entire length of the tool after ____ of the tool use.
  2. A) 1 week
  3. B) 1 day
  4. C) 60 mins
  5. D) 5 minutes

Ans: D

Level: E

Page: 282

Topic: Handheld Tool Use

  1. The hand-centered receptive fields of bimodal neurons _____ to include locations near a handheld tool in order to support control of visually guided actions with the tool.
  2. A) expand
  3. B) shrink
  4. C) retain their size
  5. D) shift

Ans: A

Level: E

Page: 282

Topic: Handheld Tool Use

  1. Mirror neurons are neurons that fire in response to:
  2. A) tactile stimulation of the hand and to visual stimuli near the hand.
  3. B) only the right hand being stimulated by a visual stimuli near the hand.
  4. C) a handheld tool being included in the hand-centered receptive field.
  5. D) an action produced and when the same action is observed being produced by others.

Ans: D

Level: M

Page: 283

Topic: Mirror Neurons

  1. The role of mirror neurons is to:
  2. A) provide a way for an animal to expand the hand-centered receptive field.
  3. B) provide a way for an animal to better perceive and understand the actions of others.
  4. C) help a baseball batter in estimating the speed of a pitch.
  5. D) aid a baseball fielder in catching a fly ball.

Ans: B

Level: M

Page: 283

Topic: Mirror Neurons

  1. A mirror neuron that is stimulated when a monkey picks up a raisin with its hand is also activated when the monkey watches a human:
  2. A) drop a raisin by hand.
  3. B) pick up a raisin by hand.
  4. C) pick up a raisin by using a tool.
  5. D) drop a raisin by using a tool.

Ans: B

Level: D

Page: 283

Topic: Mirror Neurons

  1. Linear optical trajectory is a strategy suggested to explain:
  2. A) how people stand upright even when the walls and ceiling of a room appear to move.
  3. B) the expansion of hand-centered receptive field.
  4. C) how fielders catch fly
  5. D) how baseball batter’s hit a fastball.

Ans: C

Level: M

Page: 285

Topic: How to Catch a Fly Ball

  1. _____ is a strategy used by baseball fielders to ensure that they arrive at the ball’s landing point at the same time as the ball.
  2. A) Prism adaptation
  3. B) Parabolic optical trajectory
  4. C) Linear optical trajectory
  5. D) Focus of expansion

Ans: C

Level: E

Page: 285

Topic: How to Catch a Fly Ball

  1. How would a fielder use linear optical trajectory to catch a fly ball?
  2. A) The fielder must run in a path and at a speed such that the ball appears to travel upward in a straight line at a constant speed.
  3. B) The fielder must run in a path and at a speed such that the ball appears to travel in a curved arc with a constant speed.
  4. C) The fielder must run in a curved path and at a constant speed.
  5. D) The fielder must run in a straight path such that the ball appears to travel in a curved arc with an increasing speed.

Ans: A

Level: M

Page: 285

Topic: How to Catch a Fly Ball

  1. A 90-mph fastball thrown from a professional baseball mound reaches home plate in _____ second(s).
  2. A) 2
  3. B) less than 0.5
  4. C) 4
  5. D) less than 0.1

Ans: B

Level: E

Page: 285

Topic: How to Hit a Fastball

  1. A rising fastball:
  2. A) occurs only when a pitch actually exceeds 100 mph.
  3. B) appears to travel upward in a straight line at a constant speed.
  4. C) is an illusion caused by the batter’s underestimation of the speed of the pitch.
  5. D) is an illusion caused by the batter’s overestimation of the speed of the pitch.

Ans: C

Level: M

Pages: 286-287

Topic: How to Hit a Fastball

  1. According to the text, a fastball traveling at 90 mph arrives at the plate about _____ than a fastball traveling at 95 mph.
  2. A) 3 inches higher
  3. B) 3 inches lower
  4. C) 6 inches higher
  5. D) 6 inches lower

Ans: B

Level: E

Page: 287

Topic: How to Hit a Fastball

  1. According to the text, if a 95-mph pitch is estimated to be traveling at 75 mph, the batter would misestimate the height of the ball by nearly _____.
  2. A) 3 inches
  3. B) two feet
  4. C) a foot
  5. D) an inch

Ans: C

Level: E

Page: 287

Topic: How to Hit a Fastball

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