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Seidel’s Guide to Physical Examination: An Interprofessional Approach 9th Edition Ball Test Bank

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  • Chapters: 26
  • Format: PDF
  • ISBN-13: 978-0323481953
  • ISBN-10: 9780323481953
  • Publisher‎ Mosby
  • Authors: Jane W. Ball, Joyce E. Dains , John A. Flynn , Barry S. Solomon, & Rosalyn W. Stewart

Original price was: $98.00.Current price is: $19.80.

SKU:tb1001683

Seidel’s Guide to Physical Examination: An Interprofessional Approach 9th Edition Ball Test Bank

Table of Contents

1. The History and Interviewing Process
2. Cultural Competency
3. Examination Techniques and Equipment
4. Clinical Reasoning
5. Documentation
6. Vital Signs and Pain Assessment
7. Mental Status
8. Growth, Measurement, and Nutrition
9. Skin, Hair, and Nails
10. Lymphatic System
11. Head and Neck
12. Eyes
13. Ears, Nose, and Throat
14. Chest and Lungs

 

15. Heart
16. Blood Vessels
17. Breasts and Axillae
18. Abdomen
19. Female Genitalia
20. Male Genitalia
21. Anus, Rectum, and Prostate
22. Musculoskeletal System
23. Neurologic System
24. Sports Participation Evaluation
25. Putting It All Together
26. Emergency or Life-Threatening Situations

Seidel’s Guide to Physical Examination, 9th Edition test bank

CHAPTER 01: THE HISTORY AND INTERVIEWING PROCESS
CHAPTER 02: CULTURAL COMPETENCY
CHAPTER 03: EXAMINATION TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT
CHAPTER 04: CLINICAL REASONING
CHAPTER 05: DOCUMENTATION
CHAPTER 06: VITAL SIGNS AND PAIN ASSESSMENT
CHAPTER 07: MENTAL STATUS
CHAPTER 08: GROWTH, MEASUREMENT, AND NUTRITION
CHAPTER 09: SKIN, HAIR, AND NAILS
CHAPTER 10: LYMPHATIC SYSTEM
CHAPTER 11: HEAD AND NECK
CHAPTER 12: EYES
CHAPTER 13: EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT
CHAPTER 14: CHEST AND LUNGS
CHAPTER 15: HEART
CHAPTER 16: BLOOD VESSELS
CHAPTER 17: BREASTS AND AXILLAE
CHAPTER 18: ABDOMEN
CHAPTER 19: FEMALE GENITALIA
CHAPTER 20: MALE GENITALIA
CHAPTER 21: ANUS, RECTUM, AND PROSTATE
CHAPTER 22: MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM
CHAPTER 23: NEUROLOGIC SYSTEM
CHAPTER 24: SPORTS PARTICIPATION EVALUATION
CHAPTER 25: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER
CHAPTER 26: EMERGENCY OR LIFE-THREATENING SITUATIONS

CHAPTER 01: THE HISTORY AND INTERVIEWING PROCESS
Ball: Seidel’s Guide to Physical Examination, 9th Edition
MULTIPLE CHOICE
1. Which question would be considered a “leading question?”
a. “Please describe any associated symptoms with your headaches?”
b. “You don’t get headaches often, do you?”
c. “What activities affect the severity of your headaches?”
d. “What times of the day are your headaches the most severe?”
e. “What worries you most about your headache?”
ANS: B
This question would limit the information in the patient’s
ANSwer. The other choices allow the patient more discretion about the extent of an
ANSwer.
TOP: Discipline: Behavioral Science MSC: Organ System: General
2. Which action would best promote accurate tr
ANSlations as well as confidentiality when the caregiver does not speak the patient’s language?
a. Ask a person unfamiliar with the patient to tr
ANSlate.
b. Have a friend of the patient tr
ANSlate.
c. Ask simple leading questions that the patient may understand.
d. Use a neighbor as tr
ANSlator.
e. Involve the family with the tr
ANSlation.
ANS: A
When you do not speak the patient’s language, family members or friends may pose a
communication barrier and may have issues of confidentiality; a stranger as an interpreter is less biased.
TOP: Discipline: Behavioral Science MSC: Organ System: General
3. Periods of silence during the interview can serve important purposes, such as:
a. allowing the clinician to catch up on documentation.
b. giving you a clue that you should speed up the interview.
c. providing time for reflection.
d. increasing the length of the visit.

e. promoting a calm environment.
ANS: C
Silence is a useful tool during interviews for the purposes of reflection, summoning of courage, and displaying
compassion. It is usually a clue for you to go slower and not to push too hard.
TOP: Discipline: Behavioral Science MSC: Organ System: General
4. Which technique is most likely to result in the patient’s understanding of questions? a. Use phrases that are
commonly used by other patients in the area.
b. Use the patient’s own terms if possible.
c. Use language that keeps the patient from being exp
ANSive in his or her
ANSwer.
d. Use proper medical and technical terminology.
e. Use the simplest language possible.
ANS: B To ensure that your questions have been correctly understood, be clear, and explicit while using the
patient’s idiom and level of understanding.
TOP: Discipline: Behavioral Science MSC: Organ System: General
5. A patient becomes restless during the history and says, “I don’t have time for all of this conversation. I’ve got to
get back to work.” Your most appropriate response would be to:
a. stop using open-ended questions and become more direct.
b. ask another open-ended question and insist on an
ANSwer.
c. ask questions about his anger and move closer to him.
d. acknowledge his anger and proceed with the history and examination.
e. ignore his displeasure and become more assertive about getting
ANSwers.
ANS: D
This is the only
ANSwer that resists the tendency for patient manipulation, pursues the information, and confronts the patient’s
anger.
TOP: Discipline: Behavioral Science MSC: Organ System: General
6. When questioning a patient regarding alcohol intake, she tells you that she is “only a social drinker.” Which initial
response is appropriate?
a. “I’m glad that you are a responsible drinker.”
b. “Many people who are really alcoholic say they are social drinkers.”
c. “What amount and what kind of alcohol do you drink in a week?”
d. “If you only drink socially, you won’t need to worry about always having a designated driver.”

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