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Maternal Child Nursing 5th Ed Test Bank

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  • Chapters55
  • Format: PDF
  • ISBN-13:  978-0323401708
  • ISBN-10:  9780323401708
  • Publisher‎ ‎ Saunders
  • Authors: Emily Slone McKinney, Susan R. James and etc.

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SKU:tb1001698

Maternal Child Nursing 5th Ed Test Bank

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION TO MATERNAL-CHILD HEALTH NURSING

1. Foundations of Maternity, Women’s Health, and Child Health Nursing

2. The Nurse’s Role in Maternity, Women’s Health, and Pediatric Nursing

3. The Childbearing and Child-Rearing Family

4. Communicating with Children and Families

5. Health Promotion for the Developing Child

6. Health Promotion for the Infant

7. Health Promotion During Early Childhood

8. Health Promotion for the School-Age Child

9. Health Promotion for the Adolescent

10. Heredity and Environmental Influences on Development

MATERNITY NURSING CARE

11. Reproductive Anatomy and Physiology

12. Conception and Prenatal Development

13. Adaptations to Pregnancy

14. Nutrition for Childbearing

15. Prenatal Diagnostic Tests

16. Giving Birth

17. Intrapartum Fetal Surveillance

18. Pain Management for Childbirth

19. Nursing Care During Obstetric Procedures

20. Postpartum Adaptations

21. The Normal Newborn: Adaptation and Assessment

22. The Normal Newborn: Nursing Care

23. Newborn Feeding

24. The Childbearing Family with Special Needs

25. Pregnancy-Related Complications

26. Concurrent Disorders During Pregnancy

27. The Woman with an Intrapartum Complication

28. The Woman with a Postpartum Complication

 

29. The High-Risk Newborn: Problems Related to Gestational Age and Development

30. The High-Risk Newborn: Acquired and Congenital Conditions

31. Management of Fertility and Infertility

32. Women’s Health Care

PEDIATRIC NURSING CARE

33. Physical Assessment of Children

34. Emergency Care of the Child

35. The III Child in the Hospital and Other Care Settings

36. The Child with a Chronic Condition or Terminal Illness

37. Principles and Procedures for Nursing Care of Children

38. Medication Administration and Safety for Infants and Children

39. Pain Management for Children

40. The Child with a Fluid and Electrolyte Alteration

41. The Child with an Infectious Disease

42. The Child with an Immunologic Alteration

43. The Child with a Gastrointestinal Alteration

44. The Child with a Genitourinary Alteration

45. The Child with a Respiratory Alteration

46. The Child with a Cardiovascular Alteration

47. The Child with a Hematologic Alteration

48. The Child with Cancer

49. The Child with an Alteration in Tissue Integrity

50. The Child with a Musculoskeletal Alteration

51. The Child with an Endocrine or Metabolic Alteration

52. The Child with a Neurologic Alteration

53. Psychosocial Problems in Children and Families

54. The Child with a Developmental Disability

55. The Child with a Sensory Alteration

Glossary

 

Maternal Child Nursing 5th Edition McKinney Test Bank

Chapter 01: Foundations of Maternity, Women’s Health, and Child Health Nursing
McKinney: Evolve Resources for Maternal-Child Nursing, 5th Edition
MULTIPLE CHOICE
1. Which factor significantly contributed to the shift from home births to hospital births in
the early 20th century?
a. Puerperal sepsis was identified as a risk factor in labor and delivery.
b. Forceps were developed to facilitate difficult births.
c. The importance of early parental-infant contact was identified.
d. Technologic developments became available to physicians.
ANS: D
Technologic developments were available to physicians, not lay midwives. So in-hospital
births increased in order to take advantage of these advancements. Puerperal sepsis has been a
known problem for generations. In the late 19th century, Semmelweis discovered how it could
be prevented with improved hygienic practices. The development of forceps is an example of
a technology advance made in the early 20th century but is not the only reason birthplaces
moved. Unlike home births, early hospital births hindered bonding between parents and their
infants.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Knowledge/Remembering
REF: p. 1 OBJ: Integrated Process: Teaching-Learning
MSC: Client Needs: Safe and Effective Care Environment
2. Family-centered maternity care developed in response to
a. demands by physicians for family involvement in childbirth.
b. the Sheppard-Towner Act of 1921.
c. parental requests that infants be allowed to remain with them rather than in
a nursery.
d. changes in pharmacologic management of labor.
ANS: C
As research began to identify the benefits of early extended parent-infant contact, parents
began to insist that the infant remain with them. This gradually developed into the practice
of rooming-in and finally to family-centered maternity care. Family-centered care was a
request by parents, not physicians. The Sheppard-Towner Act of 1921 provided funds for
state-managed programs for mothers and children. The changes in pharmacologic
management of labor were not a factor in family-centered maternity care.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Knowledge/Remembering
REF: p. 2 OBJ: Integrated Process: Teaching-Learning
MSC: Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity
3. Which setting for childbirth allows the least amount of parent-infant contact?
a. Labor/delivery/recovery/postpartum room

b. Birth center
c. Traditional hospital birth
d. Home birth

ANS: C
In the traditional hospital setting, the mother may see the infant for only short feeding periods,
and the infant is cared for in a separate nursery. The labor/delivery/recovery/postpartum room
setting allows increased parent-infant contact. Birth centers are set up to allow an increase in
parent-infant contact. Home births allow an increase in parent-infant contact.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Knowledge/Remembering
REF: p. 2 OBJ: Nursing Process: Planning
MSC: Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance
4. As a result of changes in health care delivery and funding, a current trend seen in the
pediatric setting is
a. increased hospitalization of children.
b. decreased number of children living in poverty.
c. an increase in ambulatory care.
d. decreased use of managed care.
ANS: C
One effect of managed care has been that pediatric health care delivery has shifted
dramatically from the acute care setting to the ambulatory setting in order to provide more
cost-efficient care. The number of hospital beds being used has decreased as more care is
given in outpatient settings and in the home. The number of children living in poverty has
increased over the past decade. One of the biggest changes in health care has been the
growth of managed care.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Knowledge/Remembering
REF: p. 5 OBJ: Nursing Process: Planning
MSC: Client Needs: Safe and Effective Care Environment
5. The Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program provides
a. well-child examinations for infants and children living at the poverty level.
b. immunizations for high-risk infants and children.
c. screening for infants with developmental disorders.
d. supplemental food supplies to low-income pregnant or breastfeeding women.
ANS: D
WIC is a federal program that provides supplemental food supplies to low-income women
who are pregnant or breastfeeding and to their children until age 5 years. Medicaid’s Early
and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment Program provides for well-child
examinations and for treatment of any medical problems diagnosed during such checkups.
Children in the WIC program are often referred for immunizations, but that is not the primary
focus of the program. Public Law 99-457 is part of the Individuals with Disabilities
Education Act that provides financial incentives to states to establish comprehensive early
intervention services for infants and toddlers with, or at risk for, developmental disabilities.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension
OBJ: Integrated Process: Teaching-Learning
MSC: Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance
REF: p. 8
6. In most states, adolescents who are not emancipated minors must have the permission of
their parents before
.

a. treatment for drug abuse.
b. treatment for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).
c. accessing birth control.
d. surgery.
ANS: D
Minors are not considered capable of giving informed consent, so a surgical procedure
would require consent of the parent or guardian. Exceptions exist for obtaining treatment for
drug abuse or STDs or for getting birth control in most states.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Knowledge/Remembering
REF: p. 17 OBJ: Nursing Process: Planning
MSC: Client Needs: Safe and Effective Care Environment
7. The maternity nurse should have a clear understanding of the correct use of a
clinical pathway. One characteristic of clinical pathways is that they
a. are developed and implemented by nurses.
b. are used primarily in the pediatric setting.
c. set specific time lines for sequencing interventions.
d. are part of the nursing process.
ANS: C
Clinical pathways are standardized, interdisciplinary plans of care devised for patients with
a particular health problem. They are used to identify patient outcomes, specify time lines to
achieve those outcomes, direct appropriate interventions and sequencing of interventions,
include interventions from a variety of disciplines, promote collaboration, and involve a
comprehensive approach to care. They are developed by multiple health care professionals
and reflect interdisciplinary care. They can be used in multiple settings and for patients
throughout the life span. They are not part of the nursing process but can be used in
conjunction with the nursing process to provide care to patients.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Knowledge/Remembering
REF: p. 7 OBJ: Nursing Process: Planning
MSC: Client Needs: Safe and Effective Care Environment
8. The fastest growing group of homeless people is
a. men and women preparing for retirement.
b. migrant workers.
c. single women and their children.
d. intravenous (IV) substance abusers.
ANS: C
Pregnancy and birth, especially for a teenager, are important contributing factors for
becoming homeless. People preparing for retirement, migrant workers, and IV substance
abusers are not among the fastest growing groups of homeless people.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Knowledge/Remembering
REF: p. 14 OBJ: Nursing Process: Assessment
MSC: Client Needs: Physiologic Integrity
.

9. A nurse wishes to work to reduce infant mortality in the United States. Which activity would
this nurse most likely participate in?
a. Creating pamphlets in several different languages using an interpreter.
b. Assisting women to enroll in Medicaid by their third trimester.
c. Volunteering to provide prenatal care at community centers.
d. Working as an intake counselor at a women’s shelter.
ANS: C
Prenatal care is vital to reducing infant mortality and medical costs. This nurse would most
likely participate in community service providing prenatal care outreach activities in
community centers, particularly in low-income areas. Pamphlets in other languages,
enrolling in Medicaid, and working at a women’s shelter all might impact infant mortality,
but the greatest effect would be from assisting women to get consistent prenatal care.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Application/Applying
REF: p. 14 OBJ: Nursing Process: Implementation
MSC: Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance
10. The intrapartum woman sees no need for a routine admission fetal monitoring strip. If
she continues to refuse, what is the first action the nurse should take?
a. Consult the family of the woman.
b. Notify the provider of the situation.
c. Document the woman’s refusal in the nurse’s notes.
d. Make a referral to the hospital ethics committee.
ANS: B
Patients must be allowed to make choices voluntarily without undue influence or coercion from
others. The physician, especially if unaware of the patient’s decision, should be notified
immediately. Both professionals can work to ensure the mother understands the rationale for the
action and the possible consequences of refusal. The woman herself is the decision maker, unless
incapacitated. Documentation should occur but is not the first action. This situation does not rise
to the level of an ethical issue so there is no reason to call the ethics committee.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Application/Applying
REF: p. 18 OBJ: Nursing Process: Implementation
MSC: Client Needs: Safe and Effective Care Environment
11. Which statement is true regarding the “quality assurance” or “incident” report?
a. The report assures the legal department that no problem exists.
b. Reports are a permanent part of the patient’s chart.
c. The nurse’s notes should contain, “Incident report filed, and copy placed in chart.”
d. This report is a form of documentation of an event that may result in legal action.
ANS: D
An incident report is used when something occurs that might result in legal action, such as a
patient fall or medication error. It warns the legal department that there may be a problem in a
particular patient’s care. Incident reports are not part of the patient’s chart; thus the nurses’
notes should not contain any reference to them.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Knowledge/Remembering
REF: p. 18 OBJ: Integrated Process: Communication and Documentation
.

MSC: Client Needs: Safe and Effective Care Environment
12. Elective abortion is considered an ethical issue because
a. abortion law is unclear about a woman’s constitutional rights.
b. the Supreme Court ruled that life begins at conception.
c. a conflict exists between the rights of the woman and the rights of the fetus.
d. it requires third-party consent.
ANS: C
Elective abortion is an ethical dilemma because two opposing courses of action are available.
The belief that induced abortion is a private choice is in conflict with the belief that elective
pregnancy termination is taking a life. Abortion laws are clear concerning a woman’s
constitutional rights. The Supreme Court has not ruled on when life begins. Abortion does not
require third-party consent.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Knowledge/Remembering
REF: p. 11 OBJ: Integrated Process: Teaching-Learning
MSC: Client Needs: Safe and Effective Care Environment
13. Which woman would be most likely to seek prenatal care?
a. A 15-year-old who tells her friends, “I don’t believe I’m pregnant.”
b. A 20-year-old who is in her first pregnancy and has access to a free prenatal clinic.
c. A 28-year-old who is in her second pregnancy and abuses drugs and alcohol.
d. A 30-year-old who is in her fifth pregnancy and delivered her last infant at home.
ANS: B
The patient who acknowledges the pregnancy early, has access to health care, and has no
reason to avoid health care is most likely to seek prenatal care. Being in denial about the
pregnancy increases the risk of not seeking care. This patient is also 15, and other social
factors may discourage her from seeking care as well. Women who abuse substances are less
likely to receive prenatal care. Some women see pregnancy and delivery as a natural
occurrence and do not seek health care.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension/Understanding
REF: p. 14 OBJ: Nursing Process: Assessment
MSC: Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance
14. A woman who delivered her baby 6 hours ago complains of headache and dizziness. The
nurse administers an analgesic but does not perform any assessments. The woman then has
a tonic-clonic seizure, falls out of bed, and fractures her femur. How would the actions of
the nurse be interpreted in relation to standards of care?
a. Negligent: the nurse failed to assess the woman for possible complications
b. Negligent: because the nurse medicated the woman
c. Not negligent: the woman had signed a waiver concerning the use of side rails
d. Not negligent: the woman did not inform the nurse of her symptoms as soon
as they occurred
ANS: A
.

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