Search

In Stock

Lehne’s Pharmacology for Nursing Care 10th Ed Test Bank

Instant delivery only

  • Chapters110
  • Format: PDF
  • ISBN-13: 978-0323512275
  • ISBN-10: 0323512275
  • Publisher‎ Saunders
  • Authors: Jacqueline Rosenjack Burchum, Laura D. Rosenthal

Original price was: $76.00.Current price is: $22.99.

SKU:tb1001707

Lehne’s Pharmacology for Nursing Care 10th Ed Test Bank

Table of Contents

UNIT I: INTRODUCTION
1. Orientation to Pharmacology
2. Application of Pharmacology in Nursing Practice
3. Drug Regulation, Development, Names, and Information
UNIT II: BASIC PRINCIPLES OF PHARMACOLOGY
4. Pharmacokinetics
5. Pharmacodynamics
6. Drug Interactions
7. Adverse Drug Reactions and Medication Errors
8. Individual Variation in Drug Responses
UNIT III: DRUG THERAPY ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN
9. Drug Therapy During Pregnancy and Breast-Feeding
10. Drug Therapy in Pediatric Patients
11. Drug Therapy in Geriatric Patients
UNIT IV: PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DRUGS
Section 1: Introduction
12. Basic Principles of Neuropharmacology
13. Physiology of the Peripheral Nervous System
Section 2: Cholinergic Drugs
14. Muscarinic Agonists and Antagonists
15. Cholinesterase Inhibitors and Their Use in Myasthenia Gravis
16. Drugs That Block Nicotinic Cholinergic Transmission: Neuromuscular Blocking Agents
Section 3: Adrenergic Drugs
17. Adrenergic Agonists
18. Adrenergic Antagonists
19. Indirect-Acting Antiadrenergic Agents
UNIT V: CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DRUGS
Section 4: Introduction
20. Introduction to Central Nervous System Pharmacology
Section 5: Drugs for Neurodegenerative Disorders
21. Drugs for Parkinson’s Disease
22. Drugs for Alzheimer’s Disease
23. Drugs for Multiple Sclerosis
Section 6: Neurologic Drugs
24. Drugs for Epilepsy
25. Drugs for Muscle Spasm and Spasticity
Section 7: Drugs for Pain
26. Local Anesthetics
27. General Anesthetics
28. Opioid Analgesics, Opioid Antagonists, and Nonopioid Centrally Acting Analgesics
29. Pain Management in Patients with Cancer
30. Drugs for Headache
Section 8: Psychotherapeutic Drugs
31. Antipsychotic Agents and Their Use in Schizophrenia
32. Antidepressants
33. Drugs for Bipolar Disorder
34. Sedative-Hypnotic Drugs
35. Management of Anxiety Disorders
36. Central Nervous System Stimulants and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
Section 9: Drug Abuse
37. Drug Abuse I: Basic Considerations
38. Drug Abuse II: Alcohol
39. Drug Abuse III: Nicotine and Smoking
40. Drug Abuse IV: Major Drugs of Abuse Other Than Alcohol and Nicotine
UNIT VI: DRUGS THAT AFFECT FLUID AND ELECTROLYTE BALANCE
41. Diuretics
42. Agents Affecting the Volume and Ion Content of Body Fluids
UNIT VII: DRUGS THAT AFFECT THE HEART, BLOOD VESSELS, AND BLOOD
43. Review of Hemodynamics
44. Drugs Acting on the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System
45. Calcium Channel Blockers
46. Vasodilators
47. Drugs for Hypertension

 

48. Drugs for Heart Failure
49. Antidysrhythmic Drugs
50. Prophylaxis of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease: Drugs That Help Normalize Cholesterol and Triglyceride Levels

51. Drugs for Angina Pectoris
52. Anticoagulant, Antiplatelet, and Thrombolytic Drugs
53. Management of ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction
54. Drugs for Hemophilia
55. Drugs for Deficiency Anemias
56. Hematopoietic Agents

UNIT VIII: DRUGS FOR ENDOCRINE DISORDERS

57. Drugs for Diabetes Mellitus
58. Drugs for Thyroid Disorders
59. Drugs Related to Hypothalamic and Pituitary Function
60. Drugs for Disorders of the Adrenal Cortex

UNIT IX: WOMEN’S HEALTH
61. Estrogens and Progestins: Basic Pharmacology and Noncontraceptive Applications
62. Birth Control
63. Drug Therapy of Infertility
64. Drugs That Affect Uterine Function
UNIT X: MEN’S HEALTH
65. Androgens
66. Drugs for Erectile Dysfunction and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia
UNIT XI: ANTI-INFLAMMATORY, ANTIALLERGIC, AND IMMUNOLOGIC DRUGS
67. Review of the Immune System
68. Childhood Immunization
69. Immunosuppressants
70. Antihistamines
71. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors: Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs and Acetaminophen
72. Glucocorticoids in Nonendocrine Disorders
UNIT XII: DRUGS FOR BONE AND JOINT DISORDERS
73. Drug Therapy of Rheumatoid Arthritis
74. Drug Therapy of Gout
75. Drugs Affecting Calcium Levels and Bone Mineralization
UNIT XIII: RESPIRATORY TRACT DRUGS
76. Drugs for Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
77. Drugs for Allergic Rhinitis, Cough, and Colds
UNIT XIV: GASTROINTESTINAL DRUGS
78. Drugs for Peptic Ulcer Disease
79. Laxatives
80. Other Gastrointestinal Drugs
UNIT XV: NUTRITION
81. Vitamins
82. Drugs for Weight Loss
UNIT XVI: CHEMOTHERAPY OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES
83. Basic Principles of Antimicrobial Therapy
84. Drugs That Weaken the Bacterial Cell Wall I: Penicillins
85. Drugs That Weaken the Bacterial Cell Wall II: Cephalosporins, Carbapenems, Vancomycin, Telavancin, Aztreonam, Teicoplanin, and Fosfomycin
86. Bacteriostatic Inhibitors of Protein Synthesis: Tetracyclines, Macrolides, and Others
87. Aminoglycosides: Bactericidal Inhibitors of Protein Synthesis
88. Sulfonamides and Trimethoprim
89. Drug Therapy of Urinary Tract Infections
90. Antimycobacterial Agents: Drugs for Tuberculosis, Leprosy, and Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection
91. Miscellaneous Antibacterial Drugs: Fluoroquinolones, Metronidazole, Daptomycin, Rifampin, Rifaximin, Bacitracin, and Polymyxins
92. Antifungal Agents
93. Antiviral Agents I: Drugs for Non-HIV Viral Infections
94. Antiviral Agents II: Drugs for HIV Infection and Related Opportunistic Infections
95. Drug Therapy of Sexually Transmitted Diseases
96. Antiseptics and Disinfectants
UNIT XVII: CHEMOTHERAPY OF PARASITIC DISEASES
97. Anthelmintics
98. Antiprotozoal Drugs I: Antimalarial Agents
99. Antiprotozoal Drugs II: Miscellaneous Agents
100. Ectoparasiticides
UNIT XVIII: CANCER CHEMOTHERAPY
101. Basic Principles of Cancer Chemotherapy
102. Anticancer Drugs I: Cytotoxic Agents
103. Anticancer Drugs II: Hormonal Agents, Targeted Drugs, and Other Noncytotoxic Anticancer Drugs
UNIT XIX: MISCELLANEOUS DRUGS AND THERAPIES
104. Drugs for the Eye
105. Drugs for the Skin
106. Drugs for the Ear
107. Additional Noteworthy Drugs
108. Complementary and Alternative Therapy
UNIT XX: TOXICOLOGY
109. Management of Poisoning
110. Potential Weapons of Biologic, Radiologic, and Chemical Terrorism

LEHNES PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSING CARE 10TH EDITION BURCHUM TEST BANK
Chapter 01: Orientation to Pharmacology
Test Bank

MULTIPLE CHOICE
1. The nurse is teaching a patient how a medication works to treat an illness. To do this, the nurse
will rely on knowledge of which topic?
ANS: D
Pharmacotherapeutics is the study of the use of drugs to diagnose, treat, and prevent conditions.
Clinical pharmacology is concerned with all aspects of drug-human interactions. Drug efficacy
measures the extent to which a given drug causes an intended effect. Pharmacokinetics is the
study of the impact of the body on a drug.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension REF: p. 1
TOP: Nursing Process: Implementation
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Physiologic Integrity: Pharmacologic and Parenteral Therapies
2. What is a desired outcome when a drug is described as easy to administer?
ANS: C
A major benefit of drugs that are easy to administer is that patients taking them are more likely to
comply with the drug regimen. Drugs that are easy to give may have the other attributes listed,
but those properties are independent of ease of administration.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension REF: p. 2
TOP: Nursing Process: Assessment
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Physiologic Integrity: Pharmacologic and Parenteral Therapies
3. A patient tells the nurse that an analgesic he will begin taking may cause drowsiness and will
decrease pain up to 4 hours at a time. Based on this understanding of the drug’s effects by the
patient, the nurse will anticipate which outcome?
a Clinical pharmacology
b Drug efficacy
c Pharmacokinetics
d Pharmacotherapeutics
a It can be stored indefinitely without need for refrigeration.
b It does not interact significantly with other medications.
c It enhances patient adherence to the drug regimen.
d It is usually relatively inexpensive to produce.

LEHNES PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSING CARE 10TH EDITION BURCHUM TEST BANK
ANS: C
A drug is effective if it produces the intended effects, even if it also produces side effects. Patients who understand both the risks and benefits of taking a medication are more likely to comply with the drug regimen.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension REF: p. 2
TOP: Nursing Process: Evaluation
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Physiologic Integrity: Pharmacologic and Parenteral Therapies
MULTIPLE RESPONSE
1. What are the properties of an ideal drug? (Select all that apply.)
ANS: B, C, D
In addition to predictability, ease of administration, and chemical stability, other properties include a reversible action so that any harm the drug may cause can be undone and a simple generic name, because generic names are usually complex and difficult to remember and pronounce.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension REF: pp. 1-2
TOP: Nursing Process: Assessment
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Physiologic Integrity: Pharmacologic and Parenteral Therapies
2. Before administering a medication, what does the nurse need to know to evaluate how individual
patient variability might affect the patient’s response to the medication? (Select all that apply.)
a Chemical stability of the medication
b Ease of administration
c Family medical history
a Decreased chance of having a placebo effect
b Decreased motivation to take the drug
c Improved compliance with the drug regimen
d Increased likelihood of drug overdose
a Irreversible action
b Predictability
c Ease of administration
d Chemical stability
e A recognizable trade name

LEHNES PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSING CARE 10TH EDITION BURCHUM TEST BANK
d Patient’s age
e Patient’s diagnosis
ANS: C, D, E
The family medical history can indicate genetic factors that may affect a patient’s response to a
medication. Patients of different ages can respond differently to medications. The patient’s illness can affect how drugs are metabolized. The chemical stability of the medication and the ease
of administration are properties of drugs.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Analysis REF: pp. 3-4
TOP: Nursing Process: Implementation
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Physiologic Integrity: Reduction of Risk Potential

LEHNES PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSING CARE 10TH EDITION BURCHUM TEST BANK
Chapter 02: Application of Pharmacology in Nursing Practice
Test Bank
MULTIPLE CHOICE
1.A patient is using a metered-dose inhaler containing albuterol for asthma. The medication label
instructs the patient to administer “2 puffs every 4 hours as needed for coughing or wheezing.”
The patient reports feeling jittery sometimes when taking the medication, and she doesn’t feel
that the medication is always effective. Which action is outside the nurse’s scope of practice?
ANS: D
It is not within the nurse’s scope of practice to change the dose of a medication without an order
from a prescriber. Asking the patient to demonstrate inhaler use helps the nurse to evaluate the
patient’s ability to administer the medication properly and is part of the nurse’s evaluation. Assessing tobacco smoke exposure helps the nurse determine whether nondrug therapies, such a
smoke avoidance, can be used as an adjuNnUctRtSoINdGruTgB.tChOerMapy. Performing a physical assessment
helps the nurse evaluate the patient’s response to the medication.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: pp. 9-10
TOP: Nursing Process: Implementation
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Physiologic Integrity: Pharmacologic and Parenteral Therapies
2. A postoperative patient is being discharged home with acetaminophen/hydrocodone [Lortab] for
pain. The patient asks the nurse about using Tylenol for fever. Which statement by the nurse is
correct?
ANS: B
Tylenol is the trade name and acetaminophen is the generic name for the same medication. It is
important to teach patients to be aware of the different names for the same drug to minimize the
risk of overdose. Over-the-counter (OTC) medications and prescription medications may be taken together unless significant harmful drug interactions are possible. Even though no drug interactions are at play in this case, both drugs contain acetaminophen, which could lead to toxicity.
a Asking the patient to demonstrate use of the inhaler
b Assessing the patient’s exposure to tobacco smoke
c Auscultating lung sounds and obtaining vital signs
d Suggesting that the patient use one puff to reduce side effects
a “It is not safe to take over-the-counter drugs with prescription medications.”
b “Taking the two medications together poses a risk of drug toxicity.”
c “There are no known drug interactions, so this will be safe.”
d “Tylenol

and Lortab are different drugs, so there is no risk of overdose.”

LEHNES PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSING CARE 10TH EDITION BURCHUM TEST BANK
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: p. 8
TOP: Nursing Process: Implementation
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Physiologic Integrity: Reduction of Risk Potential
3. The nurse is preparing to care for a patient who will be taking an antihypertensive medication.
Which action by the nurse is part of the assessment step of the nursing process?
ANS: C
The assessment part of the nursing process involves gathering information before beginning
treatment, and this includes asking about other medications the patient may be taking. Monitoring serum drug levels, watching for drug interactions, and checking vital signs after giving the
medication are all part of the evaluation phase.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: p. 6
TOP: Nursing Process: Assessment
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Phsycologyc Integrity: Reduction of Risk Potential
4. A postoperative patient reports pain, which the patient rates as an 8 on a scale from 1 to 10 (10
being the most extreme pain). The prescriber has ordered acetaminophen [Tylenol] 650 mg PO
every 6 hours PRN pain. What will the nurse do?
ANS: B
The nursing diagnosis for this patient is severe pain. Acetaminophen is given for mild to moderate pain, so the nurse should ask the prescriber to order a stronger analgesic medication. Asking
the patient to tell the nurse what has helped in the past is part of an initial assessment and should
be done preoperatively and not when the patient is having severe pain. Because the patient is
having severe pain, acetaminophen combined with nondrug therapies will not be sufficient. Increasing the frequency of the dose of a medication for mild pain will not be effective.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Analysis REF: p. 9
TOP: Nursing Process: Diagnosis
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Physiologic Integrity: Pharmacologic and Parenteral Therapies
a Asking the prescriber for an order to monitor serum drug levels
b Monitoring the patient for drug interactions after giving the medication
c Questioning the patient about over-the-counter medications
d Taking the patient’s blood pressure throughout the course of treatment
a Ask the patient what medications have helped with pain in the past.
b Contact the provider to request a different analgesic medication.
c Give the pain medication and reposition the patient to promote comfort.
d Request an order to administer the medication every 4 hours.

LEHNES PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSING CARE 10TH EDITION BURCHUM TEST BANK
5. A patient newly diagnosed with diabetes is to be discharged from the hospital. The nurse
teaching this patient about home management should begin by doing what?
ANS: A
Because insulin must be given correctly to control symptoms and because an overdose can be
fatal, it is most important for the patient to know how to administer it. Asking for a demonstration of technique is the best way to determine whether the patient has understood the teaching.
When a patient is receiving a lot of new information, the information presented first is the most
likely to be remembered. The other teaching points are important as well, but they are not as
critical and can be taught later.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: p. 9
TOP: Nursing Process: Planning
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Physiologic Integrity: Reduction of Risk Potential
6. The nurse receives an order to give morphine 5mg IV every 2 hours PRN pain. Wich action is.
not part of the six rights of drug administration?
ANS: A
Assessing the patient’s pain after administering the medication is an important part of the nursing
process when giving medications, but it is not part of the six rights of drug administration.
Checking to see when the last dose was given helps ensure that the medication is given at the
right time. Consulting a drug manual helps ensure that the medication is given in the right dose.
Documenting the reason for a pain medication is an important part of the right documentation—the sixth right.
PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: p. 9
TOP: Nursing Process: Implementation
MSC: NCLEX Client Needs Category: Physiologic Integrity: Reduction of Risk Potential
7. A patient tells a nurse that a medication prescribed for recurrent migraine headaches is not
working. What will the nurse do?
a Asking the patient to demonstrate how to measure and administer insulin
b Discussing methods of storing insulin and discarding syringes
c Giving information about how diet and exercise affect insulin requirements
d Teaching the patient about the long-term consequences of poor diabetes control
a Assessing the patient’s pain level 15 to 30 minutes after giving the medication
b Checking the medication administration record to see when the last dose was administered
c Consulting a drug manual to determine whether the amount the prescriber ordered is appropriate
d Documenting the reason the medication was given in the patient’s electronic medical record

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Write a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to Top
Product has been added to your cart