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Interpersonal Communication Relating Others 7th Edition By Beebe Redmond – Test bank

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  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0205930484
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0205930487

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SKU:tb1002548

Interpersonal Communication Relating Others 7th Edition By Beebe Redmond – Test bank

Introduction

Welcome. We’re delighted that you’ve chosen to use Interpersonal Communication as your class textbook and hope that you find the text and the accompanying resources useful and supportive.

This resource manual is designed with both the graduate teaching assistant and the twenty-years (plus) interpersonal communication teacher in mind. Some of the suggestions, from ways of getting to know your students’ names to recommendations for assessing student work, are quite basic. Other recommendations are quite innovative and cutting-edge. We hope that all instructors will find many practical suggestions in this manual.

Specifically, this manual contains the following items:

• A one-page “Chapter-at-a-Glance” summary of each chapter that includes a detailed outline, instructor resources, and available print and media supplements;
• The learning objectives for each chapter;
• A chapter overview;
• Key terms from each chapter;
• A detailed outline of each chapter;
• Suggestions for experiential activities and discussion items for each chapter.

Preparing to Teach Interpersonal Communication
In addition to reading the textbook and the Pearson resources, there are a number of other valuable considerations for preparing to teach interpersonal communication. Here are just a few good ideas:

1. Join the National Communication Association (http://www.natcom.org) and subscribe to their fine journals, including Communication Education. Membership will allow you to receive the NCA newsletter, Spectra (http://www.natcom.org/spectra) and Communication Currents (http://www.natcom.org/CommCurrentsIssue.aspx).

NCA is the oldest and largest national organization to promote communication scholarship and education. Founded in 1914 as the National Association of Academic Teachers of Public Speaking, the society incorporated in 1950 as the Speech Association of America. The organization changed its name to the Speech Communication Association, in 1970. It adopted its present name in 1997. NCA also makes available a number of resources for research and education.

2. Visit the Empathy site at http://empathy.columbusstate.edu/index.php. This site provides links for a variety of exercises for teaching empathy in interpersonal communication.
3. Visit the Free Management Library website on resources in communication skills at:
http://managementhelp.org/search/management_help_search.html?zoom_query=com munication+skills for information on a variety of communication skills.

4. Join the International Listening Association, which promotes the study, development, and teaching of listening, and the practice of effective listening skills and techniques. See their website at http://www.listen.org/.

5. Obtain a copy of your university/college’s student handbook and ensure that you are well acquainted with student obligations, rights, and responsibilities concerning interpersonal and academic conduct.

6. Visit your university’s student resource centers including the international student center, the writing center, your counseling center, and your learning resource center. It’s a good idea to post student resource information on bulletin boards in or near your classroom to assist students in obtaining support.

7. Visit your institution’s faculty resource center and get acquainted with your everdeveloping technological options for presenting information. If you have a professional website developed, you’ll want to publish your syllabus and other useful information (like handouts) for your students.

8. Test the equipment in your classroom to ensure that you know how your electronic devices operate. It is very frustrating for students to watch their instructors learn during class sessions how to operate computers and other equipment. More and more of our students are computer savvy and wonder at our clumsiness.

9. Get to know your colleagues in the communication department. They are a rich resource and will provide you with endless resources and support as you teach this course.

10. Visit your local commercial bookstore and check out the popular books now available on interpersonal communication topics. Your students are likely to ask you about these authors (e.g., John Grey or Daniel Coleman).

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