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Human Exceptionality School Community And Family 12th Edition by Michael L. Hardman – Test Bank

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  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1305500970
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1305500976

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Human Exceptionality School Community And Family 12th Edition by Michael L. Hardman – Test Bank

1. Opponents of the current IDEA definition of serious emotional disturbance have criticized its lack of clarity,
incompleteness, and exclusion of persons described as
a. having autism.
b. having attention deficit disorders.
c. being socially maladjusted.
d. being conduct disordered.
ANSWER: c
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.02 – Explain the various definitions and classifications of EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
NOTES: Opponents of the IDEA definition see it as being very vague and incomplete. Also, this
definition excludes individuals identified as socially maladjusted. Furthermore the
definition mandates that assessment personnel demonstrate that EBD adversely impacts
students’ school achievement.
2. Compared with their peers, students with EBD tend to have an
a. average IQ. b. average to below-average IQ.
c. average to above-average IQ. d. above-average IQ.
ANSWER: b
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.03 – Describe the characteristics and prevalence of children and
youth with EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
3. Which of the following does not contribute to increased risk for EBD?
a. Poverty b. Parental drug use
c. Positive factors d. Family discord
ANSWER: c
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.04 – List the causes and risk factors associated with EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
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4. Effects of child abuse on young children may include
a. withdrawal. b. aggression.
c. enuresis. d. withdrawal, aggression, and enuresis.
ANSWER: d
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.04 – List the causes and risk factors associated with EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.2.0 – Beginning special education professionals create safe,
inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments so that individuals with
exceptionalities become active and effective learners and develop emotional well-being,
positive social interactions, and self-determination.
5. Geni reports that her twelve-year-old son has, for the past year, been persistently eating paint chips and plaster. This is
an example of
a. anorexia. b. bulimia.
c. pica. d. rumination.
ANSWER: c
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Applying
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.02 – Explain the various definitions and classifications of EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
United States – CEC.4.0 – Beginning special education professionals use multiple
methods of assessment and data sources in making educational decisions.
6. Disorders that may result in depressed mood, social withdrawal, irritability, and other serious medical conditions
include
a. rumination.
b. pica.
c. attention deficit and disruptive behavior disorders.
d. anorexia and bulimia.
ANSWER: d
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.02 – Explain the various definitions and classifications of EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
NOTES: Of those receiving treatment for anorexia and bulimia, 5 to 10% will die from
complications of these conditions.
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7. At what age should parents become concerned if their child has consistent problems with bowel and bladder control
that is not a function of any physical disorder?
a. Seven or eight b. Six or seven
c. Five or six d. Four or five
ANSWER: d
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.02 – Explain the various definitions and classifications of EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.7.0 – Beginning special education professionals collaborate with
families and other educators, related services providers, individuals with exceptionalities,
and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways to address the
needs of individuals with exceptionalities across a range of learning experiences.
NOTES: Children who continue to soil or wet past age 4 or 5 may be diagnosed as having an
elimination disorder, particularly if the soiling or wetting problem is not a function of
some physical abnormality.
8. Which disorder is characterized by involuntary, rapid repetitions of words or phrases?
a. Identity disorder b. Gender disorder
c. Tic disorder d. Disruptive behavior disorder
ANSWER: c
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Remembering
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.02 – Explain the various definitions and classifications of EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
NOTES: Tic disorders include involuntary, rapid repetitions of words or phrases as well as other
stereotypical movements and gestures.
9. Harry is thirteen years old with a documented early history of grossly inadequate parental care. He exhibits noticeably
abnormal and developmentally inept social relatedness. It is likely that Harry has
a. selective mutism. b. childhood schizophrenia.
c. bulimia. d. reactive attachment disorder.
ANSWER: d
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Applying
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.02 – Explain the various definitions and classifications of EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
United States – CEC.2.0 – Beginning special education professionals create safe,
inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments so that individuals with
exceptionalities become active and effective learners and develop emotional well-being,
positive social interactions, and self-determination.
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10. A student who is inordinately fearful about future events, and has difficulty separating from a parent or another close
relationship is likely to be experiencing
a. pervasive developmental disorders. b. psychosomatic disorders.
c. anxiety disorders. d. disruptive behavior disorders.
ANSWER: c
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.02 – Explain the various definitions and classifications of EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
11. Pre-referral interventions are designed to
a. identify behavior and academic
problems.
b. reduce the likelihood of more restrictive placement.
c. make environmental
adaptations.
d. identify behavior and academic problems and reduce the likelihood of
more restrictive placement.
ANSWER: d
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Analyzing
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.05 – Describe the assessment procedures used to identify EBD in
children and youth.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.4.0 – Beginning special education professionals use multiple
methods of assessment and data sources in making educational decisions.
NOTES: Pre-referral interventions are designed to address students’ identified behavioral and
academic problems and to reduce the likelihood of further, more restrictive placements.
12. Mr. Mitchell is concerned about the problematic behavior of one student. Before submitting a formal referral for
special education Mr. Mitchell will probably
a. make certain the behavior disorder is diagnosed.
b. complete several observations using formal behavioral checklists.
c. hold several conferences with the parents.
d. implement a behavior modification techniques program.
ANSWER: c
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Applying
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.05 – Describe the assessment procedures used to identify EBD in
children and youth.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
United States – CEC.4.0 – Beginning special education professionals use multiple
methods of assessment and data sources in making educational decisions.
NOTES: The actual submission of a referral for a student is generally preceded by several
parent-teacher conferences. These conferences help teachers and parents determine
what actions should be taken.
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13. Jim’s teacher is interested in identifying the antecedents to his problem behavior, developing an accurate operational
definition of the behavior, and describing the actual consequences of the behavior. The best model for this is
a. normative assessment. b. alternate assessment.
c. criterion-referenced assessment. d. functional assessment.
ANSWER: d
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Applying
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.05 – Describe the assessment procedures used to identify EBD in
children and youth.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.4.0 – Beginning special education professionals use multiple
methods of assessment and data sources in making educational decisions.
United States – CEC.5.0 – Beginning special education professionals select, adapt, and
use a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to advance learning of
individuals with exceptionalities.
14. The purpose of a functional behavioral assessment is to
a. identify early traumatic events in the child or youth’s life that give rise to the behavior problems.
b. identify the salient parent/child interactions that culminated in challenging behaviors.
c. identify the functions of a student’s behavior in relationship to various school or home settings.
d. identify the features of the neighborhood environment that give rise to the challenging behaviors.
ANSWER: c
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Remembering
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.05 – Describe the assessment procedures used to identify EBD in
children and youth.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.4.0 – Beginning special education professionals use multiple
methods of assessment and data sources in making educational decisions.
NOTES: The purpose of this assessment is to identify the functions of a student’s behavior in
relationship to various school or home settings.
15. An integral part of the systems-of-care for children with behavior disorders is
a. the provision of school-wide programs.
b. the use of neighborhood-based case management.
c. the creation of well-managed, self-contained classrooms.
d. the controlling of aberrant behaviors.
ANSWER: a
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.01 – Describe how the lives of people with emotional and
behavioral disorders (EBD) have changed since the advent of IDEA.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.7.0 – Beginning special education professionals collaborate with
families and other educators, related services providers, individuals with exceptionalities,
and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways to address the
needs of individuals with exceptionalities across a range of learning experiences.
NOTES: One of the essential features of systems of cares is the provision of schoolwide and
early intervention programs.
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16. Post-high school employment rates for students with emotional and behavior disorders are as follows:
a. 41 percent are employed two years later. b. 79 percent are employed two years later.
c. 59 percent are employed two years later. d. 25 percent are employed two years later.
ANSWER: a
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Remembering
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.03 – Describe the characteristics and prevalence of children and
youth with EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
NOTES: Only 41% of students with EBD who have exited high school are employed two years
later, compared with 59% of typical adolescents who have left or completed high school.
17. Recent research suggests that the dropout rate for youth with emotional and behavior disorders is
a. 10-30 percent. b. 30-50 percent.
c. 50-70 percent. d. 70-90 percent.
ANSWER: c
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Remembering
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.03 – Describe the characteristics and prevalence of children and
youth with EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
NOTES: Unfortunately, the dropout rate for students with emotional or behavior disorders is 51-
70 percent.
18. Most special classes for children with moderate to severe disorders
a. use instructional strategies that focus on controlling children.
b. have high student to teacher ratios.
c. feature close teacher monitoring of student performance and reinforcement based on student behaviors.
d. are focused on the child’s behavior at home.
ANSWER: c
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Remembering
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.06 – Describe the different interventions for children and youth
with EBD from early childhood through adulthood.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.2.0 – Beginning special education professionals create safe,
inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments so that individuals with
exceptionalities become active and effective learners and develop emotional well-being,
positive social interactions, and self-determination.
United States – CEC.5.0 – Beginning special education professionals select, adapt, and
use a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to advance learning of
individuals with exceptionalities.
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19. Wraparound services
a. represent a fixed structure for assembling a network of services and agencies for children and youth with
behavior disorders.
b. center on approaches to service provision that are primarily focused on the child or youth with behavior
disorders.
c. might include in-home child management training, employment assistance and family therapy.
d. focus primarily a curriculum of control.
ANSWER: c
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Remembering
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.06 – Describe the different interventions for children and youth
with EBD from early childhood through adulthood.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.2.0 – Beginning special education professionals create safe,
inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments so that individuals with
exceptionalities become active and effective learners and develop emotional well-being,
positive social interactions, and self-determination.
United States – CEC.4.0 – Beginning special education professionals use multiple
methods of assessment and data sources in making educational decisions.
United States – CEC.5.0 – Beginning special education professionals select, adapt, and
use a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to advance learning of
individuals with exceptionalities.
20. Which of the following behaviors represents an externalizing disorder?
a. Feeling abandoned. b. Hearing voices.
c. Spitting on a sibling. d. Experiencing test anxiety.
ANSWER: c
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Analyzing
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.02 – Explain the various definitions and classifications of EBD.
NOTES: Children or youth who exhibit externalizing behaviors may be described as engaging in
behaviors that are directed more at others than at themselves.
21. Which of the following behaviors represents an internalizing disorder?
a. Experiencing anxiety. b. Challenging authority figures.
c. Refusing to follow teacher directions. d. Setting fires.
ANSWER: a
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Analyzing
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.02 – Explain the various definitions and classifications of EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
NOTES: Withdrawal, depression, shyness, and phobias are examples of internalized behaviors.
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22. The poor academic outcomes of students with EBD can be attributed to
a. the preparation of the teachers who work with these students
b. interventions are directed primarily towards behavior rather academic skills.
c. the poor quality of the academic instruction these students often receive.
d. the preparation of the teachers who work with these students, interventions are directed primarily towards
behavior rather academic skills, and the poor quality of the academic instruction these students often receive.
ANSWER: d
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.03 – Describe the characteristics and prevalence of children and
youth with EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
NOTES: Some attribute these poor outcomes to the preparation of the teachers who work with
these students and to the poor quality of the academic instruction these students often
receive. Additionally, interventions for students with EBD have often been directed
primarily at controlling behavior and developing social competence rather than building
academic skills and promoting achievement
23. Peta received wraparound approach (WRAP) services. What does the approach entail?
a. Unconditional care, least restrictive care, and school-based care approach
b. An intensive, complete, team/community approach to develop skills and behaviors
c. Therapy approach focused on the role of thinking and language on behavior
d. An approach based on restricted hospital-centered or punitive services
ANSWER: b
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Analyzing
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.06 – Describe the different interventions for children and youth
with EBD from early childhood through adulthood.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
United States – CEC.2.0 – Beginning special education professionals create safe,
inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments so that individuals with
exceptionalities become active and effective learners and develop emotional well-being,
positive social interactions, and self-determination.
United States – CEC.5.0 – Beginning special education professionals select, adapt, and
use a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to advance learning of
individuals with exceptionalities.
United States – CEC.7.0 – Beginning special education professionals collaborate with
families and other educators, related services providers, individuals with exceptionalities,
and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways to address the
needs of individuals with exceptionalities across a range of learning experiences.
NOTES: WRAP is an intensive, complete, team/community approach involving children and youth
and their families so that they can thrive in their homes, local schools, and communities
and develop the skills and behaviors needed for successful living and learning.
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24. A basic feature of the systems of care concept is that
a. it reflects a philosophy about the way in which services should
be delivered to children, youth, and their families.
b. services are rarely coordinated.
c. most children and youth with EBD receive treatments and
interventions in isolation from their families, homes,
neighborhoods.
d. is based on the assumption that students’
problems were primarily of their own
making.
ANSWER: a
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.06 – Describe the different interventions for children and youth
with EBD from early childhood through adulthood.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
United States – CEC.2.0 – Beginning special education professionals create safe,
inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments so that individuals with
exceptionalities become active and effective learners and develop emotional well-being,
positive social interactions, and self-determination.
United States – CEC.5.0 – Beginning special education professionals select, adapt, and
use a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to advance learning of
individuals with exceptionalities.
United States – CEC.7.0 – Beginning special education professionals collaborate with
families and other educators, related services providers, individuals with exceptionalities,
and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways to address the
needs of individuals with exceptionalities across a range of learning experiences.
NOTES: One of the basic features of the systems of care concept is that it does not represent a
prescribed structure for assembling a network of services and agencies. Rather, it
reflects a philosophy about the way in which services should be delivered to children,
youth, and their families.
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25. Services in the WRAP and /or systems of care might include
a. home-based
interventions.
b. special class placement.
c. therapeutic foster care. d. home-based interventions, special class placement, and therapeutic foster
care.
ANSWER: d
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Analyzing
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.06 – Describe the different interventions for children and youth
with EBD from early childhood through adulthood.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
United States – CEC.2.0 – Beginning special education professionals create safe,
inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments so that individuals with
exceptionalities become active and effective learners and develop emotional well-being,
positive social interactions, and self-determination.
United States – CEC.5.0 – Beginning special education professionals select, adapt, and
use a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to advance learning of
individuals with exceptionalities.
United States – CEC.7.0 – Beginning special education professionals collaborate with
families and other educators, related services providers, individuals with exceptionalities,
and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways to address the
needs of individuals with exceptionalities across a range of learning experiences.
NOTES: These services might include home-based interventions, special class placement,
therapeutic foster care, financial assistance, primary health care, outpatient treatment,
career education, after-school programs, and carefully tailored family support.
26. As defined in IDEA, the learning difficulties that young students with emotional and behavior disorders exhibit are due
to sensory impairments and/or mild retardation.
a. True
b. False
a. True
b. False
ANSWER: False
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.04 – List the causes and risk factors associated with EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
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27. Feeding and eating disorders may not be considered as an emotional or behavior disorder in IDEA.
a. True
b. False
a. True
b. False
ANSWER: False
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Analyzing
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.02 – Explain the various definitions and classifications of EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
28. The causes of behavioral disorders are multifaceted and often complex.
a. True
b. False
a. True
b. False
ANSWER: True
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.04 – List the causes and risk factors associated with EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
29. Classification provides professionals with common terms for communicating with one another.
a. True
b. False
a. True
b. False
ANSWER: True
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.02 – Explain the various definitions and classifications of EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.7.0 – Beginning special education professionals collaborate with
families and other educators, related services providers, individuals with exceptionalities,
and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways to address the
needs of individuals with exceptionalities across a range of learning experiences.
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30. Only behaviors that are internalized are viewed as being problematic.
a. True
b. False
a. True
b. False
ANSWER: False
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.03 – Describe the characteristics and prevalence of children and
youth with EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.4.0 – Beginning special education professionals use multiple
methods of assessment and data sources in making educational decisions.
31. The clinically derived classification systems used in the DSM-5 are the same as used by schools and IDEA.
a. True
b. False
a. True
b. False
ANSWER: False
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Analyzing
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.05 – Describe the assessment procedures used to identify EBD in
children and youth.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
32. Due to the problem behaviors associated with EBD, school professionals are advised to avoid the use of positive
behavior supports
a. True
b. False
a. True
b. False
ANSWER: False
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.06 – Describe the different interventions for children and youth
with EBD from early childhood through adulthood.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.5.0 – Beginning special education professionals select, adapt, and
use a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to advance learning of
individuals with exceptionalities.
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33. The purpose of behavior plans is to replace problem behaviors with useful, functional behaviors that advance a child’s
social and academic development.
a. True
b. False
a. True
b. False
ANSWER: True
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Applying
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.5.0 – Beginning special education professionals select, adapt, and
use a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to advance learning of
individuals with exceptionalities.
34. In the US, youth gangs represent the largest segment of criminally active, peer centered groups.
a. True
b. False
a. True
b. False
ANSWER: True
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.5.0 – Beginning special education professionals select, adapt, and
use a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to advance learning of
individuals with exceptionalities.
35. Identify three of the essential parts of the IDEA definitions of emotional/behavioral disorders.
ANSWER: 1) Behaviors must be exhibited to a marked extent; 2) Learning problems not
attributable to intellectual, health, or other sensory deficits are common; 3) Relationships
are difficult;
4) Behaviors that occur in many settings and under normal circumstances are
considered inappropriate; 5) Unhappiness or depression is pervasive; 6) Physical
symptoms or fears associated with school are common.
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.02 – Explain the various definitions and classifications of EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
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36. Describe how the definition from the National Special Education and Mental Health Coalition attempts to provide
greater clarity and precision in describing EBD.
ANSWER: This definition provides a more precise basis for identifying children and youth with
EBD. Its advantages include a consideration of cultural and ethnic norms, the inclusion
of challenging emotional and behavioral responses of children and youth, the durability of
the problematic behaviors, a specification of multiple settings in which the behaviors
occur, a documented lack of responsiveness to general education interventions, and the
fact that EBD can co-occur with other disabilities.
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.02 – Explain the various definitions and classifications of EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
37. Identify the general social characteristics of children and youth with E/BD.
ANSWER: Children and youth with E/BD exhibit a variety of problems in adapting to their home,
school, and community environments. They usually exhibit difficulties in relating socially
and responsibly to peers, parents, teachers, and other authority figures. In short, students
with EBD are generally difficult to teach and to parent.
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.03 – Describe the characteristics and prevalence of children and
youth with EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities.
38. Identify the general academic achievement characteristics of children and youth with E/BD.
ANSWER: Students with EBD experience significant difficulties and deficits in academic subject
areas, and rarely catch up academically Compared to other students with disabilities,
children and youth with E/BD exhibit the poorest academic outcomes. Drop out and
graduation rates for students with EBD are staggering.
REFERENCES: Bloom’s: Understanding
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: HESC.HARD.17.08.03 – Describe the characteristics and prevalence of children and
youth with EBD.
NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States – CEC.1.0 – Beginning special education professionals understand how
exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to
provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with
exceptionalities

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