Search

In Stock

Human Biology 14 Edition By by Sylvia Mader – Test Bank

Instant delivery only

  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1259245748
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1259245749

$29.00

Compare
SKU:tbb1001816

Human Biology 14 Edition By by Sylvia Mader – Test Bank

Chapter 10
Respiratory System

Multiple Choice Questions

1. Ventilation includes
A. inspiration only.
B. expiration only.
C. both inspiration and expiration.
D. the volume of air that can be exhaled.
E. the transportation of oxygen to the cells in the body.
Ventilation is another term for breathing that includes both inspiration and expiration.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.01.01 Summarize the role of the respiratory system in the body.
Section: 10.01
Topic: Human Respiratory System

2. The respiratory system is responsible for
A. oxygen entering the body and carbon dioxide leaving the body.
B. carbon dioxide entering the body and oxygen leaving the body.
C. nitrogen leaving the blood stream.
D. methane formation.
E. the regulation of nutrient absorption.
The respiratory system is responsible for oxygen entering the body and carbon dioxide leaving the body.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.01.01 Summarize the role of the respiratory system in the body.
Section: 10.01
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

Short Answer Questions

3. List the structures associated with the upper respiratory tract and those associated with the lower respiratory tract.
Upper respiratory tract structures include the nasal cavity, pharynx, glottis, and larynx.
Lower respiratory tract structures include the trachea, bronchus, bronchioles, lungs and diaphragm.

Blooms Level: 6. Create
Learning Outcome: 10.01.03 Identify the structures of the human respiratory system.
Section: 10.01
Topic: Human Respiratory System

Multiple Choice Questions

4. What do inspiration and expiration have in common?
A. They both use the same pathways.
B. The air travels in the same direction in both.
C. They both end in the lungs.
D. They both conduct air from the outside.
E. They both remove wastes from the tissues.
Inspiration and expiration utilize the same pathway, just in opposite directions.

Blooms Level: 4. Analyze
Learning Outcome: 10.01.02 Distinguish between inspiration and expiration.
Section: 10.01
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

Short Answer Questions

5. Explain the nervous system’s control of the respiratory system.
The rhythm of ventilation is controlled by a respiratory control center located in the medulla oblongata of the brain. The respiratory control center automatically sends out a nerve signal to the diaphragm and the external intercostal muscles of the rib cage. This causes inspiration to occur. When the respiratory center stops sending nerve signals to the diaphragm and the rib cage, the muscles relax and expiration occurs.

Blooms Level: 6. Create
Learning Outcome: 10.05.01 Explain how the nervous system controls the process of breathing.
Section: 10.05
Topic: Human Respiratory System

Multiple Choice Questions

6. Which structure is not part of the inspiration process?
A. lungs
B. larynx
C. trachea
D. bronchioles
E. All are part of the inspiration process.
All of the structures play a role in the inspiration process.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.01.02 Distinguish between inspiration and expiration.
Section: 10.01
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

True / False Questions

7. The role of the respiratory system is to ensure that oxygen leaves the body and carbon dioxide enters the body.
FALSE
The role of the respiratory system is to ensure that carbon dioxide leaves the body and oxygen enters the body.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.01.01 Summarize the role of the respiratory system in the body.
Section: 10.01
Topic: Human Respiratory System

8. Inhalation is another word for inspiration.
TRUE
Both inhalation and inspiration are terms to describe breathing in.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.01.02 Distinguish between inspiration and expiration.
Section: 10.01
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

Multiple Choice Questions

9. Which of the following is not part of the respiratory system?
A. trachea
B. pharynx
C. esophagus
D. bronchus
E. nasal cavity
The esophagus is part of the digestive system.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.01.03 Identify the structures of the human respiratory system.
Section: 10.01
Topic: Human Respiratory System

10. Which structure is the initial entry way for air to enter the respiratory system?
A. nose
B. trachea
C. lungs
D. pharynx
E. esophagus
The air will initially enter the nose, then proceed to the nasal cavity, to the pharynx, to the trachea, to the bronchioles, and to the lungs. The esophagus is part of the digestive system, not the respiratory system.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.02.01 Summarize the role of the nose, pharynx, and larynx in respiration.
Section: 10.02
Topic: Human Respiratory System

11. Which part of the respiratory system is composed of skeletal muscle?
A. diaphragm
B. lung
C. trachea
D. larynx
E. glottis
The diaphragm is a skeletal muscle that functions in ventilation.

Blooms Level: 5. Evaluate
Learning Outcome: 10.01.03 Identify the structures of the human respiratory system.
Section: 10.01
Topic: Human Respiratory System

12. Which respiratory structure is used to produce sound?
A. larynx
B. nose
C. pharynx
D. glottis
E. esophagus
The larynx houses the vocal cords which produce sound when air moves through them. The nose does not produce sound. The pharynx is the passage way that connects the nasal and oral cavities. The glottis is the slit between the vocal cords that allows the air to leave. The esophagus is part of the digestive system.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.02.01 Summarize the role of the nose, pharynx, and larynx in respiration.
Section: 10.02
Topic: Human Respiratory System

13. Which part of the respiratory system carries out gas exchange?
A. bronchus
B. larynx
C. nasal cavity
D. lungs
E. diaphragm
The lungs contain alveoli which carry out gas exchange.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.01.03 Identify the structures of the human respiratory system.
Section: 10.01
Topic: Human Respiratory System

14. During respiration, which structure connects the larynx to the bronchiole tree?
A. trachea
B. glottis
C. lungs
D. alveoli
E. esophagus
The trachea connects the larynx to the bronchiole tree. The glottis is the opening in the larynx. The lungs receive the air from the trachea. The alveoli are the site of gas exchange within the lungs. The esophagus is part of the digestive system.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.03.01 Summarize the role of the trachea, bronchial tree, and lungs in respiration.
Section: 10.03
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

True / False Questions

15. The respiratory is unlike the digestive system in that air comes in and out the same opening.
TRUE
In the respiratory system, air comes in and out of the nasal cavity. In the digestive system, food goes in the mouth and waste comes out the anus.

Blooms Level: 4. Analyze
Learning Outcome: 10.01.03 Identify the structures of the human respiratory system.
Section: 10.01
Topic: Human Respiratory System

16. During respiration, as the thorax moves up, the lungs move down.
FALSE
During respiration, the lungs follow the movement of the lungs. If the thorax moves upwards the lungs will also move upwards.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.03.01 Summarize the role of the trachea, bronchial tree, and lungs in respiration.
Section: 10.03
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

Multiple Choice Questions

17. Which of the following is not part of the upper respiratory tract?
A. bronchi
B. nasal cavity
C. epiglottis
D. pharynx
E. glottis
The bronchi are part of the lower respiratory tract.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.02.02 Identify the structures of the upper respiratory system and provide their function.
Section: 10.02
Topic: Human Respiratory System

18. Which part of the pharynx is mismatched with its location?
A. nasopharynx–where the nasal cavities open above
B. oropharynx–where the sinuses open
C. laryngopharynx–where the pharynx opens into the larynx
The oropharynx is where the oral cavity opens.

Blooms Level: 4. Analyze
Learning Outcome: 10.02.02 Identify the structures of the upper respiratory system and provide their function.
Section: 10.02
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

True / False Questions

19. The pharynx contains the vocal cords.
FALSE
The larynx, or voice box, contains the vocal cords.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.02.03 Explain how sound is produced by the larynx.
Section: 10.02
Topic: Human Respiratory System

Multiple Choice Questions

20. If it were not for the nasal cavity,
A. we would not be able to speak.
B. more debris would enter the lungs.
C. oxygen would not be exchanged in the alveoli.
D. food would go down the wrong pipe.
E. air would not be conducted to the lungs.
One of the functions of the nasal cavity is to filter the air and trap small particles so they don’t enter the air passages.

Blooms Level: 4. Analyze
Learning Outcome: 10.02.01 Summarize the role of the nose, pharynx, and larynx in respiration.
Section: 10.02
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

True / False Questions

21. The pharynx contains the tonsils that protect against invasion of inhaled foreign particles.
TRUE
The tonsils form a protective ring at the junction of the oral cavity and the pharynx.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.02.02 Identify the structures of the upper respiratory system and provide their function.
Section: 10.02
Topic: Human Respiratory System

22. The epiglottis is the slit between the vocal cords.
FALSE
The glottis is the slit between the vocal cords.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.02.03 Explain how sound is produced by the larynx.
Section: 10.02
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

Multiple Choice Questions

23. When the glottis becomes narrower,
A. the pitch of sound goes up.
B. the pitch of sound goes down.
C. sound ceases completely.
D. the volume increases.
E. the volume decreases.
The greater the tension, as when the glottis becomes narrower, the higher the pitch. The volume of the sound is dependent on the amplitude of the vibrations.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.02.03 Explain how sound is produced by the larynx.
Section: 10.02
Topic: Human Respiratory System

True / False Questions

24. Sound is produced when air rushes into the lungs.
FALSE
Sound is produced when air is expelled from the lungs.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.02.03 Explain how sound is produced by the larynx.
Section: 10.02
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

Multiple Choice Questions

25. Which of the following is not part of the lower respiratory tract?
A. bronchi
B. lungs
C. alveoli
D. trachea
E. larynx
The larynx is part of the upper respiratory tract.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.03.02 Identify the structures of the lower respiratory system and provide their function.
Section: 10.03
Topic: Human Respiratory System

26. Which part of the lower respiratory tract is intimately in contact with the cardiovascular system?
A. lungs
B. bronchial tree
C. trachea
D. esophagus
E. sinus cavity
The lungs contain the alveoli where gas exchange occurs between the cardiovascular system and the respiratory system.

Blooms Level: 4. Analyze
Learning Outcome: 10.03.01 Summarize the role of the trachea, bronchial tree, and lungs in respiration.
Section: 10.03
Topic: Human Respiratory System

27. Where in the lower respiratory tract would you find goblet cells?
A. bronchial tree
B. trachea
C. lungs
D. esophagus
E. nasal cavity
The goblet cells line the trachea and produce mucus within the lower respiratory tract.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.03.02 Identify the structures of the lower respiratory system and provide their function.
Section: 10.03
Topic: Human Respiratory System

True / False Questions

28. The right lung is larger than the left lung.
TRUE
The right lung has three lobes, and the left lung has two lobes, allowing room for the heart.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.03.02 Identify the structures of the lower respiratory system and provide their function.
Section: 10.03
Topic: Human Respiratory System

29. The trachea and upper bronchial tree are similar in that both are held open by cartilaginous rings.
TRUE
The upper bronchial tree and the trachea are both held open by cartilaginous rings.

Blooms Level: 4. Analyze
Learning Outcome: 10.03.02 Identify the structures of the lower respiratory system and provide their function.
Section: 10.03
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

Multiple Choice Questions

30. What separates the lungs from the thoracic cavity?
A. pleura
B. alveoli
C. cartilaginous rings
D. bone
E. skeletal muscle
Each lung is enclosed by a serous membrane called a pleura (pl., pleurae).

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.03.02 Identify the structures of the lower respiratory system and provide their function.
Section: 10.03
Topic: Human Respiratory System

31. What is missing in infant respiratory distress syndrome?
A. bronchioles
B. pleura
C. one or more lobes of the lung
D. alveoli
E. surfactant
The surfactant that prevents the alveoli from closing is missing in infant respiratory distress syndrome.

Blooms Level: 3. Apply
Learning Outcome: 10.03.03 Explain how the alveoli increase the efficiency of the respiratory system.
Section: 10.03
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

True / False Questions

32. The total cross sectional area of the alveoli is about the size of a textbook.
FALSE
The total cross sectional area of the alveoli is about the size of a tennis court.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.03.03 Explain how the alveoli increase the efficiency of the respiratory system.
Section: 10.03
Topic: Human Respiratory System

Multiple Choice Questions

33. What diffuses from the air in the alveoli into the blood?
A. oxygen
B. carbon dioxide
C. water
D. nitrogen
E. methane
Oxygen flows from the air in the alveoli into the bloodstream.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.03.03 Explain how the alveoli increase the efficiency of the respiratory system.
Section: 10.03
Topic: Human Respiratory System

34. Which of the following is not a part of inspiration?
A. The pressure in the lungs increases.
B. The rib cage moves up and out.
C. The intercostal muscles pull the ribs outward.
D. The diaphragm contracts and moves down.
E. Air rushes into the lungs.
During inspiration, the pressure in the lungs decreases.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.04.01 Contrast the processes of inspiration and expiration during ventilation.
Section: 10.04
Topic: Human Respiratory System

True / False Questions

35. Muscle contraction is required for expiration.
FALSE
Expiration is the passive part of ventilation when the muscles relax.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.04.01 Contrast the processes of inspiration and expiration during ventilation.
Section: 10.04
Topic: Human Respiratory System

36. Humans inhale by negative pressure.
TRUE
The creation of a partial vacuum in the alveoli causes air to enter the lungs.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.04.01 Contrast the processes of inspiration and expiration during ventilation.
Section: 10.04
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

Multiple Choice Questions

37. Why is the actual flow of air into the alveoli during inspiration passive?
A. because there is a continuous column of air from the pharynx to the alveoli
B. because the lungs are surrounded by the thoracic wall
C. because the alveoli have a very large surface area
D. because the intercostal muscles are involved
E. because the diaphragm is involved
Even though the creation of the negative pressure is active, the air flows in because there is a continuous column of air from the pharynx to the alveoli.

Blooms Level: 5. Evaluate
Learning Outcome: 10.04.01 Contrast the processes of inspiration and expiration during ventilation.
Section: 10.04
Topic: Human Respiratory System

38. The amount of air that moves in and out with each breath is called the
A. vital capacity.
B. tidal volume.
C. inspiratory reserve volume.
D. expiratory reserve volume.
E. residual volume.
The amount of air that moves in and out with each breath is the tidal volume.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.04.02 Define the terms tidal volume, vital capacity, and residual volume in relation to ventilation.
Section: 10.04
Topic: Human Respiratory System

39. If you force inspiration, how much more air can you breathe in than the tidal volume?
A. two times
B. three times
C. four times
D. five times
E. six times
The tidal volume is 500 ml, whereas the forced inspiration volume adds approximately another 3000 ml to that.

Blooms Level: 5. Evaluate
Learning Outcome: 10.04.03 Summarize the purpose of the inspiratory and expiratory reserve volumes.
Section: 10.04
Topic: Human Respiratory System

40. Which volume can add an additional 2,900 ml of air to the lungs?
A. inspiratory reserve volume
B. expiratory reserve volume
C. residual volume
D. vital capacity
E. tidal volume
The inspiratory reserve volume can add an additional 2,900 ml of air to the lungs. The expiratory reserve volume is the additional volume of air that can be exhaled from the lungs which is usually 1,400 ml. The residual volume is the amount of air that can’t be exhaled from the lungs. Vital capacity is the maximum amount of air that can be inhaled and exhaled by a deep breath. Tidal volume is the normal amount of air that moves in and out during a normal breath.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.04.03 Summarize the purpose of the inspiratory and expiratory reserve volumes.
Section: 10.04
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

True / False Questions

41. Some of the inhaled air never reaches the lungs.
TRUE
This air fills the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles which are considered dead air space.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.04.02 Define the terms tidal volume, vital capacity, and residual volume in relation to ventilation.
Section: 10.04
Topic: Human Respiratory System

Multiple Choice Questions

42. During respiration, what is the additional amount of air that can be exhaled from the lungs during an extra deep exhalation called? This volume is usually around 1,400 ml.
A. expiratory reserve volume
B. inspiratory reserve volume
C. residual volume
D. vital capacity
E. tidal volume
The expiratory reserve volume is the additional volume of air that can be exhaled from the lungs which is usually 1,400 ml. The inspiratory reserve volume can add an additional 2,900 ml of air to the lungs. The residual volume is the amount of air that can’t be exhaled from the lungs. Vital capacity is the maximum amount of air that can be inhaled and exhaled by a deep breath. Tidal volume is the normal amount of air that moves in and out during a normal breath.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.04.03 Summarize the purpose of the inspiratory and expiratory reserve volumes.
Section: 10.04
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

Short Answer Questions

43. List the volumes of air associated with each of the following lung capacities.
inspiratory reserve volume
expiratory reserve volume
tidal volume
residual volume
vital capacity
total lung capacity
The average volumes are as follows:
inspiratory reserve volume 2,900 ml
expiratory reserve volume 1,400 ml
tidal volume 500 ml
residual volume 1,000 ml
vital capacity 4,800 ml
total lung capacity 5,800 ml

Blooms Level: 6. Create
Learning Outcome: 10.04.02 Define the terms tidal volume, vital capacity, and residual volume in relation to ventilation.
Section: 10.04
Topic: Human Respiratory System

Multiple Choice Questions

44. The vital capacity is equal to the
A. maximum amount of air breathed in.
B. maximum amount of air breathed out.
C. maximum amount of air breathed in and the maximum amount of air breathed out.
D. the air left in the lungs after exhalation.
E. the air that comes in during a normal breath.
The vital capacity is equal to the maximum amount that can be moved in plus the maximum amount that can be moved out during a single breath.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.04.02 Define the terms tidal volume, vital capacity, and residual volume in relation to ventilation.
Section: 10.04
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

True / False Questions

45. You cannot increase the amount of air you exhale.
FALSE
You can increase expiration by contracting the abdominal and thoracic muscles.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.04.01 Contrast the processes of inspiration and expiration during ventilation.
Section: 10.04
Topic: Human Respiratory System

Multiple Choice Questions

46. Where is the respiratory control center located?
A. in the brain
B. in the bronchi
C. in the lungs
D. in the aorta
E. in the diaphragm
The respiratory control center is located in the medulla oblongata of the brain.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.05.01 Explain how the nervous system controls the process of breathing.
Section: 10.05
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

Yes / No Questions

47. Can you hold your breath until you die?
NO
No. You can hold your breath until you pass out, and then your brain will take over respirations.

Blooms Level: 3. Apply
Learning Outcome: 10.05.01 Explain how the nervous system controls the process of breathing.
Section: 10.05
Topic: Human Respiratory System

Multiple Choice Questions

48. How does the respiratory center control the diaphragm?
A. via the blood carbon dioxide level
B. via the blood pH
C. via the intercostal nerves
D. via the phrenic nerve
E. via the vagus nerve
The respiratory center communicates with the diaphragm via the phrenic nerve.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.05.01 Explain how the nervous system controls the process of breathing.
Section: 10.05
Topic: Human Respiratory System

49. When the pH of the blood becomes more acidic, the respiratory center
A. increases the rate and increases the depth of breathing.
B. increases the rate and decreases the depth of breathing.
C. decreases the rate and increases the depth of breathing.
D. decreases the rate and decreases the depth of breathing.
E. stops breathing all together.
The respiratory center increases both the rate and depth of breathing to remove more carbon dioxide from the blood.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.05.02 Explain the role of chemoreceptors and pH levels in regulating breathing rate.
Section: 10.05
Topic: Human Respiratory System

True / False Questions

50. Chemoreceptors for blood pH are located in the brain stem and the lungs.
FALSE
Chemoreceptors for blood pH are located in the brain stem, in the carotid arteries, and in the aorta.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.05.02 Explain the role of chemoreceptors and pH levels in regulating breathing rate.
Section: 10.05
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

Multiple Choice Questions

51. Carotid bodies and aortic bodies detect
A. blood pH.
B. oxygen blood levels.
C. oxygen tissue levels.
D. stretching of the lungs.
E. the residual volume.
Carotid bodies and aortic bodies are chemoreceptors that are sensitive to blood pH.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.05.02 Explain the role of chemoreceptors and pH levels in regulating breathing rate.
Section: 10.05
Topic: Human Respiratory System

52. How are internal and external respiration alike?
A. Both involve an exchange of gases.
B. Both involve carbon dioxide diffusing into the lungs.
C. Both involve oxygen diffusing into the lungs.
D. Both involve carbon dioxide diffusing into the body’s tissues.
E. Both involve oxygen diffusing into the body’s tissues.
Both involve an exchange of gases. In external respiration, carbon dioxide diffuses into the lungs and oxygen into the blood, and in internal respiration, carbon dioxide diffuses into the blood and oxygen into the tissue.

Blooms Level: 4. Analyze
Learning Outcome: 10.06.01 Distinguish between external and internal respiration.
Section: 10.06
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

True / False Questions

53. When you breathe into a paper bag after hyperventilating, you are decreasing the amount of carbon dioxide in the blood.
FALSE
You are increasing the amount of carbon dioxide in the blood and therefore restoring a normal blood pH.

Blooms Level: 3. Apply
Learning Outcome: 10.06.02 Summarize the chemical processes that are involved in external and internal respiration.
Section: 10.06
Topic: Human Respiratory System

Multiple Choice Questions

54. Most of the carbon dioxide is carried in the plasma as
A. carbonic anhydrase.
B. bicarbonate ion.
C. carbonic acid.
D. a gas, carbon dioxide.
E. reduced hemoglobin.
Carbon dioxide is carried as bicarbonate ions.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.06.02 Summarize the chemical processes that are involved in external and internal respiration.
Section: 10.06
Topic: Human Respiratory System

55. How does breathing at a very low rate affect the reaction H+ + HCO3-  H2CO3  H2O + CO2 ?
A. pushes it to the right
B. pushes it to the left
C. does not affect it
D. increases the rate at which it occurs
E. decreases the rate at which it occurs
This pushes the reaction to the left and increases the pH of the blood.

Blooms Level: 3. Apply
Learning Outcome: 10.06.02 Summarize the chemical processes that are involved in external and internal respiration.
Section: 10.06
Topic: Human Respiratory System

56. Which way does the reaction H+ + HCO3-  H2CO3  H2O + CO2 proceed in the lungs?
A. to the right
B. to the left
C. to the right and then back to the left
D. this reaction doesn’t proceed in the lungs
E. none of these
In the lungs, the reaction goes to the right and releases carbon dioxide into the lungs.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.06.02 Summarize the chemical processes that are involved in external and internal respiration.
Section: 10.06
Topic: Human Respiratory System

57. Which reaction does carbonic anhydrase catalyze?
A. H+ + HCO3-  H2CO3
B. H2CO3  H2O + CO2
C. Hb + O2  HbO2
D. HbO2  Hb + O2
E. None of these.
Carbonic anhydrase catalyzes the breakdown of carbonic acid to water and carbon dioxide.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.06.03 Identify the role of carbonic anhydrase and carbaminohemoglobin in respiration.
Section: 10.06
Topic: Human Respiratory System

True / False Questions

58. Carbonic anhydrase and carbaminohemoglobin are similar in that they are both enzymes involved in respiration.
FALSE
Carbonic anhydrase is an enzyme involved in respiration, but carbaminohemoglobin is hemoglobin bound to carbon dioxide.

Blooms Level: 4. Analyze
Learning Outcome: 10.06.03 Identify the role of carbonic anhydrase and carbaminohemoglobin in respiration.
Section: 10.06
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

Multiple Choice Questions

59. Which of the following infections does not affect a structure in the respiratory tract?
A. laryngitis
B. strep throat
C. tonsilitis
D. otitis media
E. bronchitis
Otitis media is an infection of the middle ear. It is included in respiratory infections because it is often a complication seen in children with nasal infections.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.07.01 Identify the symptoms and causes of selected upper respiratory tract infections.
Section: 10.07
Topic: Human Respiratory System

60. “Strep throat” is caused by what type of infecting organism?
A. bacteria
B. virus
C. fungus
D. parasitic worm
E. protist
“Strep throat” is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.07.01 Identify the symptoms and causes of selected upper respiratory tract infections.
Section: 10.07
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

True / False Questions

61. One of the main symptoms of a sinus infection is hoarseness.
FALSE
Hoarseness is a symptom of laryngitis, not sinusitis. Symptoms of sinusitis include postnasal discharge and facial pain.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.07.01 Identify the symptoms and causes of selected upper respiratory tract infections.
Section: 10.07
Topic: Human Respiratory System

Multiple Choice Questions

62. Which of the following is not a lower respiratory infection?
A. tuberculosis
B. pneumonia
C. bronchitis
D. pulmonary fibrosis
E. pulmonary tuberculosis
Pulmonary fibrosis is a restrictive pulmonary disorder, but it is not an infection.

Blooms Level: 2. Understand
Learning Outcome: 10.07.02 Identify the symptoms and causes of selected lower respiratory tract disorders.
Section: 10.07
Topic: Human Respiratory System

63. Upon X-ray, it could be seen that Josh’s lungs were filled with fluid. What is the proper diagnosis for Josh’s illness?
A. bronchitis
B. emphysema
C. asthma
D. pulmonary fibrosis
E. pneumonia
Pneumonia occurs when alveoli fill with pus and fluid making gas exchange difficult.

Blooms Level: 3. Apply
Learning Outcome: 10.07.02 Identify the symptoms and causes of selected lower respiratory tract disorders.
Section: 10.07
Topic: Human Respiratory System

64. Which of these lower respiratory diseases should be treated with antibiotics?
A. pulmonary fibrosis
B. pulmonary tuberculosis
C. emphysema
D. asthma
E. lung cancer
Pulmonary tuberculosis is caused by a bacterial infection and should be treated with antibiotics.

Blooms Level: 5. Evaluate
Learning Outcome: 10.07.02 Identify the symptoms and causes of selected lower respiratory tract disorders.
Section: 10.07
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

True / False Questions

65. The difference between a restrictive pulmonary disorder and an obstructive pulmonary disorder is that in the restrictive disorder the lungs have lost their elasticity and in an obstructive disorder air does not flow freely in the airways.
TRUE
Restrictive disorders include pulmonary fibrosis while obstructive disorders include asthma and chronic bronchitis.

Blooms Level: 4. Analyze
Learning Outcome: 10.07.02 Identify the symptoms and causes of selected lower respiratory tract disorders.
Section: 10.07
Topic: Human Respiratory System

66. Lung cancer, just like breast cancer, is more prevalent in women than in men.
FALSE
Lung cancer is more prevalent in men.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.07.03 Summarize the relationship among smoking, cancer, and emphysema.
Section: 10.07
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

Multiple Choice Questions

67. What is the correct order of the following steps in the progression of lung cancer in a smoker? 1. Cilia are lost. 2. There is a thickening and callusing of the cells lining the bronchi. 3. Metastasis occurs. 4. A tumor forms. 5. Cells with atypical nuclei appear.
A. 1,2,3,4,5
B. 2,1,5,4,3
C. 5,1,2,3,4
D. 1,2,4,3,5
E. 2,1,4,5,3
There appears to be thickening and callusing of the cells lining the bronchi. This is followed by the loss of cilia, cells with atypical nuclei, and the formation of a tumor. Finally, metastasis occurs.

Blooms Level: 4. Analyze
Learning Outcome: 10.07.03 Summarize the relationship among smoking, cancer, and emphysema.
Section: 10.07
Topic: Human Respiratory System

True / False Questions

68. Even if you quit smoking, the damage to your lungs is already done and they will not return to normal.
FALSE
If the body tissues are not already cancerous, the lungs may return to normal over time.

Blooms Level: 1. Remember
Learning Outcome: 10.07.03 Summarize the relationship among smoking, cancer, and emphysema.
Section: 10.07
Topic: Human Respiratory System

 

Multiple Choice Questions

69. Which of the following is not a symptom of emphysema?
A. The elastic recoil of the lungs is reduced.
B. The surface area for gas exchange is reduced.
C. The alveoli are distended and their walls damaged.
D. The airways are inflamed and filled with mucus.
E. The heart works harder to force more blood through the lungs.
In chronic bronchitis, the airways are inflamed and filled with mucus.

Blooms Level: 4. Analyze
Learning Outcome: 10.07.03 Summarize the relationship among smoking, cancer, and emphysema.
Section: 10.07
Topic: Human Respiratory System

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Write a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to Top
Product has been added to your cart